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Monthly Archives: February 2012

Classroom Valentine boxes were great but cruel

The passage below is from the novel “Arse Over Teakettle,” a story of a young boy coming of age in Toronto during the 1940s. It is a heart-warming tale of his struggle to mature, both sexually and intellectually. In the quote below, the main character of the story, Tom Hudson, tells about St. Valentine’s Day.

9781450205313-Perfect.indd

February was synonymous with the celebration of St. Valentine’s Day. In the window of the School Store, I noticed that valentines had appeared, costing two cents each. The five and dime stores, such as Woolworth and Kresge’s, sold books of cutout valentines. These were cheaper, and I considered them inferior. I also gazed longingly through the School Store windows at the boxes of goodies. They included small, red, cinnamon hearts and other candies, about the size of a twenty-five-cent coin, in various designs. My favourite were those that were heart-shaped. Printed on the candies were expressions such as, Kiss Me, I Love You, Be My Valentine, Do You Love Me? I’m Yours, or Hugs and Kisses. The candies were two for a penny.

In the classroom, during art period I helped decorate the cardboard valentine box. In its top, my teacher, Miss Campbell cut a narrow slit, resembling a mail slot. During the week of Valentine’s, at the beginning of each day, and immediately after lunch break, we inserted valentines for our friends. On the fourteenth of the month, near the end of the day, the teacher opened the box and monitors delivered the valentines to their designated owners. I sat expectantly at my desk, waiting for my cards, while surreptitiously glancing around the room to observe how many cards the other children received.

I knew that the popular kids accumulated many. A few classmates received only two, sometimes sent by their own hand. I was grateful that I was not one of them. My modest collection of eight cards was respectable. One of them was signed, “Guess Who?” Most kids received at least one of these mystery cards, and sometimes two. Upon receiving it, I gazed around the room, attempting to catch a telltale expression that might betray the sender. I never discovered the identity of the person.

Eventually, schools discarded the custom of the Valentine Day box, as they realized that it was an insensitive tradition.

For further information on the three volumes of the Toronto trilogy:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/21/the-toronto-trilogy-recreates-the-citys-past-while-providing-intriguing-stories/

The author’s Home Page:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/ 

 
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Posted by on February 15, 2012 in Toronto

 

Remember the Valentine Day boxes in school classrooms and the heart-shaped candies?

The passage below is from the novel “Arse Over Teakettle,” a story of a young boy coming of age in Toronto during the 1940s. It is a heart-warming tale of his struggle to mature, both sexually and intellectually. In the quote below, the main character of the story, Tom Hudson, tells about St. Valentine’s Day.

9781450205313-Perfect.indd

February was synonymous with the celebration of St. Valentine’s Day. In the window of the School Store, I noticed that valentines had appeared, costing two cents each. The five and dime stores, such as Woolworth and Kresge’s, sold books of cutout valentines. These were cheaper, and I considered them inferior. I also gazed longingly through the School Store windows at the boxes of goodies. They included small, red, cinnamon hearts and other candies, about the size of a twenty-five-cent coin, in various designs. My favourite were those that were heart-shaped. Printed on the candies were expressions such as, Kiss Me, I Love You, Be My Valentine, Do You Love Me? I’m Yours, or Hugs and Kisses. The candies were two for a penny.

In the classroom, during art period I helped decorate the cardboard valentine box. In its top, my teacher, Miss Campbell cut a narrow slit, resembling a mail slot. During the week of Valentine’s, at the beginning of each day, and immediately after lunch break, we inserted valentines for our friends. On the fourteenth of the month, near the end of the day, the teacher opened the box and monitors delivered the valentines to their designated owners. I sat expectantly at my desk, waiting for my cards, while surreptitiously glancing around the room to observe how many cards the other children received.

I knew that the popular kids accumulated many. A few classmates received only two, sometimes sent by their own hand. I was grateful that I was not one of them. My modest collection of eight cards was respectable. One of them was signed, “Guess Who?” Most kids received at least one of these mystery cards, and sometimes two. Upon receiving it, I gazed around the room, attempting to catch a telltale expression that might betray the sender. I never discovered the identity of the person.

Eventually, schools discarded the custom of the Valentine Day box, as they realized that it was an insensitive tradition.

The first book of the Toronto Trilogy, “Arse Over teakettle,” will be available at the Chapters/Indigo store at Richmond and John Streets in downtown Toronto on the day of the book signing for the second book of the trilogy, “The Reluctant Virgin.”

       Book Signing 

Sunday, 11 March 3 pm to 5 pm

Chapters/Indigo Store

Richmond and John Streets

Toronto 

For further information on the three volumes of the Toronto trilogy:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/21/the-toronto-trilogy-recreates-the-citys-past-while-providing-intriguing-stories/

The author’s Home Page:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/ 

 
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Posted by on February 14, 2012 in Toronto

 

Remembering the day Elizabeth II became queen

Photo_48

I was a student in high school when King George VI died on 6 February in 1952, and Elizabeth II was proclaimed queen. The day remains as fixed in my memory as the day President Kennedy was assassinated. Similarly, I can recall the day Paul Henderson scored the winning goal in the Summit Series in the Soviet Union in 1972, and again in February of 2010, when Sidney Crosby slammed in the overtime goal in the Vancouver Winter Olympics. Everyone has milestone events in their lives that they retain, despite the passage of time.

The passage below is from the book, “The Reluctant Virgin.” The death of King George VI is told through the eyes of the book’s central character, Tom Hudson. He is in a classroom at the high school he attends, his best friend, Shorty Bernstein, seated in the desk beside him. I employed my own memories of the event to write this section of the novel.

On Wednesday 6 February, Tom trudged to school under dismal skies, sullen clouds scuttling over the frozen landscape. Arriving in Mr. Roger’s classroom, his homeroom, within minutes he heard the static noise on the P.A. system at the front of the room, and waited for the booming voice of the rotund principal, Mr. Tyrone Evanson. Each morning he instructed the students to stand for the playing of “God Save the King.” On this morning, Tom heard only buzzing sounds on the PA—no voice. Everyone gazed up at the loudspeaker, wondering what had happened to dear old Gus.

Shorty whispered to Tom, “I bet his stomach swallowed him.”

After twenty or thirty seconds, they heard Vice-Principal Mr. Dinkman say, “Please remain in your seats. Mr. Evanson has an important announcement for the student body.”

Another four or five-second-delay ensued.

Then Dinkman said reverently, “Here is your principal.”

“Staff and students,” Gus began, in a voice dripping with self-importance, “it is with the greatest regret that I make the following announcement. At six o’clock this morning, Toronto time, his majesty King George VI, sovereign of Great Britain, the Commonwealth and the Empire, passed away quietly in his sleep.”

Mr. Evanson paused again, the silence in the classroom almost overwhelming. “The school flag has been lowered,” he continued. “It is now at half-mast, in respect for our beloved sovereign, who reigned over our Dominion for fifteen years and one month. He was a good king, but more important, a noble person. For those of us who served during the war years, we will always remember his words on September 3, 1939, when the conflict commenced, ‘Stand fast and have faith,’” he said. We would do well to embrace his words in our hearts today. We expect all members of York Collegiate Institute to conduct themselves today with dignity and decorum. The Privy Council, constitutional advisers to British monarchs, has formally accepted Elizabeth II as queen. Please stand as we listen to the anthem ‘God Save the Queen.’”

Tom realized that the death of the king had deeply moved Mr. Evanson, but he knew nothing about Mr. Evanson’s background. Tom was unaware that the principal’s father was British, and he had raised his son in a home that revered the traditions of the monarchy. Being a monarchist like his father, the death of King George VI had profoundly shaken him.

For Tom, the words “God Save the Queen” sounded strange and unnatural. All throughout his days of elementary school, the word “king” had seemed an eternal part of the national anthem. A new age was dawning, but Tom had no way of knowing that during the years following the ascension of Queen Elizabeth, great changes would occur in the daily life of Canadians.

On this morning in February of 1952, when the playing of the anthem ended, silence prevailed. Nobody was certain how to react. Throughout the morning at school, the hallways were quiet as students rotated between classes. No teacher cracked a joke. They remained serious and business-like. Tom understood something of the sorrow and finality of death, as he had observed people grieve at the annual Remembrance Day services. The war had ended only seven years earlier, and wounds remained unhealed. He had witnessed powerful emotions among those who had survived and the terrible pain the losses had inflicted. When he had been six-years old, his uncle Will had passed away, and he remembered how it had devastated his family, especially his grandmother.

How would the death of the king affect Canadians?

One thing was certain. The events pushed any thoughts of the Stritch murder from the minds of Tom and his friends.

DSCN5851

 

For further information on the “The Reluctant Virgin,”

a murder/mystery that encompasses historical fiction:  https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/29/chilling-murdermystery-showcases-toronto/

A link to the author’s Home Page: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
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Posted by on February 11, 2012 in Toronto

 

View restored postcards of Toronto’s Bay Street and Yonge Streets

Collecting old postcards of Toronto has been a fascinating hobby. Sometimes, the cards I find are in very poor condition, the colours faded and pieces missing. I photographed these cards, applied adhesives to the surface of the copies, and then employed acrylic paints to restore the pictures. I hid the cracks in the postcards, removed blemishes, eliminated hydro lines, and covered ink marks from the post office. Then I re-photographed the cards, sometimes producing interesting results. If examined carefully, in an enlarged copy of the re-worked pictures, brush-strokes are evident, particularly in the sky.

In each case, because I was working on a “copy” of the card, the integrity of the original card was preserved. Below are two of the postcards that I converted.

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Bay St. looking north to Queen and the Old City Hal, c.1920

DSCN0664

Yonge Street looking north to Queen St., c. 1910

My interest in the city of Toronto has been a life-long passion. Within the last ten years, I have published four books employing the city as either the subject, or in the case of the novels, as the background. The novels include many archival photographs to assist the reader to envision Toronto during the decade that the story takes place. The non-fiction book, “The Villages Within” was nominated for the “Toronto Heritage Awards.” The other three novels all received “Editor’s Choice Awards.”

For information of these books, following the link to my Home Page: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
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Posted by on February 11, 2012 in Toronto

 

First two books of Doug Taylor’s Toronto Trilogy available at Chapters/Indigo

The first and second books of the Toronto Trilogy, “Arse Over Teakettle” and “The Reluctant Virgin”are available at any Chapters/Indigo store

9781450205313-Perfect.indd

      

For further information on the three volumes of the Toronto trilogy:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/21/the-toronto-trilogy-recreates-the-citys-past-while-providing-intriguing-stories/

The author’s Home Page:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/ 

 
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Posted by on February 10, 2012 in Toronto

 

Remembering 6 February 1952 as well as the day Pres. Kennedy died

9781450205313-Perfect.indd

I was a student in high school when King George VI died on 6 February in 1952. The day remains as fixed in my memory as the day President Kennedy was assassinated. Similarly, I can recall the day Paul Henderson scored the winning goal in the Summit Series in the Soviet Union in 1972, and again in February of 2010, when Sidney Crosby slammed in the overtime goal in the Vancouver Winter Olympics. Everyone has milestone events in their lives that they retain, despite the passage of time.

The passage below is from the book, “The Reluctant Virgin. The death of King George VI is told through the eyes of the book’s central character, Tom Hudson. He is in a classroom at the high school he attends, his best friend, Shorty Bernstein, seated in the desk beside him. I employed my own memories of the event to write this section of the novel.

On Wednesday 6 February, Tom trudged to school under dismal skies, sullen clouds scuttling over the frozen landscape. Arriving in Mr. Roger’s classroom, his homeroom, within minutes he heard the static noise on the P.A. system at the front of the room, and waited for the booming voice of the rotund principal, Mr. Tyrone Evanson. Each morning he instructed the students to stand for the playing of “God Save the King.” On this morning, Tom heard only buzzing sounds on the PA—no voice. Everyone gazed up at the loudspeaker, wondering what had happened to dear old Gus.

Shorty whispered to Tom, “I bet his stomach swallowed him.”

After twenty or thirty seconds, they heard Vice-Principal Mr. Dinkman say, “Please remain in your seats. Mr. Evanson has an important announcement for the student body.”

Another four or five-second-delay ensued.

Then Dinkman said reverently, “Here is your principal.”

“Staff and students,” Gus began, in a voice dripping with self-importance, “it is with the greatest regret that I make the following announcement. At six o’clock this morning, Toronto time, his majesty King George VI, sovereign of Great Britain, the Commonwealth and the Empire, passed away quietly in his sleep.”

Mr. Evanson paused again, the silence in the classroom almost overwhelming. “The school flag has been lowered,” he continued. “It is now at half-mast, in respect for our beloved sovereign, who reigned over our Dominion for fifteen years and one month. He was a good king, but more important, a noble person. For those of us who served during the war years, we will always remember his words on September 3, 1939, when the conflict commenced, ‘Stand fast and have faith,’” he said. We would do well to embrace his words in our hearts today. We expect all members of York Collegiate Institute to conduct themselves today with dignity and decorum. The Privy Council, constitutional advisers to British monarchs, has formally accepted Elizabeth II as queen. Please stand as we listen to the anthem ‘God Save the Queen.’”

Tom realized that the death of the king had deeply moved Mr. Evanson, but he knew nothing about Mr. Evanson’s background. Tom was unaware that the principal’s father was British, and he had raised his son in a home that revered the traditions of the monarchy. Being a monarchist like his father, the death of King George VI had profoundly shaken him.

For Tom, the words “God Save the Queen” sounded strange and unnatural. All throughout his days of elementary school, the word “king” had seemed an eternal part of the national anthem. A new age was dawning, but Tom had no way of knowing that during the years following the ascension of Queen Elizabeth, great changes would occur in the daily life of Canadians.

On this morning in February of 1952, when the playing of the anthem ended, silence prevailed. Nobody was certain how to react. Throughout the morning at school, the hallways were quiet as students rotated between classes. No teacher cracked a joke. They remained serious and business-like. Tom understood something of the sorrow and finality of death, as he had observed people grieve at the annual Remembrance Day services. The war had ended only seven years earlier, and wounds remained unhealed. He had witnessed powerful emotions among those who had survived and the terrible pain the losses had inflicted. When he had been six-years old, his uncle Will had passed away, and he remembered how it had devastated his family, especially his grandmother.

How would the death of the king affect Canadians?

One thing was certain. The events pushed any thoughts of the Stritch murder from the minds of Tom and his friends.

Reluc. Virgin

 

For further information on the “The Reluctant Virgin,”

a murder/mystery that encompasses historical fiction:  https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/29/chilling-murdermystery-showcases-toronto/

“The Reluctant Virgin” by Doug Taylor

is available at any Chapters/Indigo store and

also on-line in electronic versions.

A link to the author’s Home Page: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
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Posted by on February 6, 2012 in Toronto

 

Toronto learns of the death of King George VI on 6 Feb. 1952 on the CBC

DSCN5850

The murder/mystery entitled “The Reluctant Virgin,” is the story of a serial killer loose on the streets of Toronto during the 1950s. However, in reality the book is historical fiction. The important events of the decade are woven into the fictional plot. My memories of the death of King George VI formed the basis for the section that occurs when the king passes away. The detailed descriptions of the city during this post-war period and the archival photos create a high degree of reality to the tale. Though it is unusual to place photos within a fictional murder/mystery, they serve a vital purpose. They allow the reader to visualize the city of those years.

Along with the historical events of the 1950s, the book deals with the social issues of the decade. Attitudes towards unwed mothers, divorced women, women’s rights, pre-marital sex, and sexual orientation are important to the plot. “The Reluctant Virgin” is no mere murder/mystery. Readers who wish to experience the Toronto of the 1950s within an entertaining venue, will enjoy this book.

The passage below from “The Reluctant Virgin,” tells about the central character of the book, Tom Hudson, returning home from school after learning during the morning of the death of King George VI .

When Tom entered the back door of his home, he saw that his mom had placed his lunch on the kitchen table. From the dining room, he could hear the radio. His mom was listening to the news. As he joined her, sandwich in hand, he stopped in the doorway and listened to the broadcast, a repeat of an earlier transmission. He now learned the details of the death of the monarch.

The early-morning BBC announcement was repeated, “It is with the greatest regret that I make the following announcement…”

Tom recognized the words. They were the same ones that Gus had employed on the P.A. system at the start of the school day. It crossed Tom’s mind that Gus had likely plagiarized them.

Then the announcer continued, “The king, fifty-six years of age, died in his sleep at Sandringham. He was discovered by his valet at 7:30 am, having died in the same house in which he had been born, on 14 December in 1895. The valet immediately summoned the queen to his bedside. Later, the staff reported that she had not wept, but that her face was wracked with grief.

“She gently kissed his forehead, and after several minutes silence said, ‘We must tell…’and she hesitated ‘…must tell the queen.’

“The king had had surgery the previous September, and a part of one lung had been removed. They had reported that he had been recovering nicely. He had gone hunting the day before his death and retired early in the evening. The cause of death was reported to be coronary thrombosis—a blood clot.”

The CBC newscast ended with the statement, “Radio Moscow announced the death of the king in four short words—George the sixth died.”

After school, Tom delivered his newspapers. He observed the quiet and respectful manner in which people scanned the front pages. He remembered the reactions of his customers when they had glanced at the front-page pictures of the Noronic in flames, when the ship had burnt in 1949 in Toronto harbour. On that occasion, their silence had portrayed shock and dismay. The news of the death of the king produced quiet acceptance and sadness at the passing of someone whom they had admired.

George VI was the monarch who had delivered guidance and hope through the horrific years of the Second World War. People remembered his resolution not to abandon London and retreat to the safety of the countryside. When Buckingham Palace had been bombed, he had declared that he now shared the sorrow of loss with others who had suffered during the blitz. As people scanned the articles on the front page and saw the peaceful regal photo of their late king, they knew that the sceptre of a generation had been passed to another’s hand.

For further information on the “The Reluctant Virgin,” a murder/mystery that encompasses historical fiction:  https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/29/chilling-murdermystery-showcases-toronto/

Author’s Home Page : https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

Link to purchase this book : http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000188306/The-Reluctant-Virgin.aspx

“The Reluctant Virgin” is available at any Chapters/Indigo store and also can be ordered on-line in electronic versions.

 
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Posted by on February 5, 2012 in Toronto

 

View archival photos of Toronto while reading a chilling murder/mystery

000013_20  000013_5

    Gazing north on Yonge from Front St.            Yonge St. looking south to College St.

Reluc. Virgin

Though it is unusual to insert archival photos in a fictional tale, this technique adds a sense of realism to the the book, “The Reluctant Virgin.” The setting of the story is 1950s Toronto. The city of that decade is faithfully recreated, the photos adding greatly to the reader’s ability to picture the scenes. It’s as if Toronto has become the backstage of a “movie set,” the script written to fit into the already constructed set. 

The story is about a serial killer who seeks victims from various haunts in Toronto, and after dispatching them, drains their blood in some sort of strange ritual. Toronto readers will be familiar with the places where the murders are committed – Humber River Valley, High Park, the Rosedale Ravine, Centre Island, a sleazy downtown hotel, and a tavern on the Danforth.

The book abounds with unusual and eccentric characters. Because the first murder-victim is a teacher at a high school, the police interrogate the teachers on the staff where she taught. The teachers are a wild and strange assortment of characters.The nymphomaniac of an art teacher is particularly amusing, as is the gym teacher and the weepy-eyed librarian. However below the surface of these humorous individuals lurks a possible deranged killer.

“The Reluctant Virgin” is a book for those readers who enjoy a murder/mystery while exploring Toronto’s past. The book is historical fiction and deals with the social and political issues of the 1950s as it weaves through a suspenseful and twisted plot of murder and revenge.

Below are two of the many 1950s photos included in the “The Reluctant Virgin.” They are from the collection of the Toronto Archives.

000013_9  000013_21

Yonge near Queen during subway construction         Yonge, looking north to Queen

For more information on the book, follow the link https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/29/chilling-

Author’s Home Page : https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To purchase electronic versions of the book or order paperback copies: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000188306/The-Reluctant-Virgin.aspx

“The Reluctant Virgin” is available at any Chapters/Indigo store and can be ordered in electronic versions on-line.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 5, 2012 in Toronto

 

A portrayal of Toronto on the day of the funeral of King George VI

DSCN5850

The murder/mystery entitled “The Reluctant Virgin,” is the story of a serial killer loose on the streets of Toronto during the 1950s. However, in reality the book is historical fiction. The important events of the decade are woven into the fictional plot. My memories of the day of the funeral of King George VI on 15 February in 1952 formed the basis for the section that appears in the book. The detailed descriptions of the city during this post-war period and the archival photos give a high degree of reality to the tale. Though it is unusual to place photos within a fictional murder/mystery, they serve a vital purpose. They allow the reader to visualize the city of those years.

Along with the historical events of the 1950s, the book deals with the social issues of the decade. Attitudes towards unwed mothers, divorced women, women’s rights, pre-marital sex, and sexual orientation are important to the plot. “The Reluctant Virgin” is no mere murder/mystery. Readers who wish to experience the Toronto of the 1950s within an entertaining venue, will enjoy this book.

The passage below from “The Reluctant Virgin,” describes Toronto on the day the funeral was held in London for King George VI .

In Toronto, on the day of the funeral, it was as if an almighty hand had silenced the humble residential streets and grand avenues—Rosedale was as silent as Cabbagetown. The pulse of the great metropolis had ceased to throb. Factory whistles were silent, automobiles’ horns remained untouched, and the noisy clatter of the streetcars on Yonge Street appeared strangely out of place. Shops lacked customers. Restaurants were nearly empty. Many residents attended one of the numerous funeral services, the largest being in Maple Leaf Gardens.

In the evening, bars and restaurants were quiet, some having closed their doors to all customers. The CBC broadcast Gabriel Faure’s celebrated “Requiem.” It was more than the death of the king that had stunned the city into immobility. His passing had severed an important link with the past—the war years. Despite the horrors of battle, people remained proud that the Empire and the English-speaking peoples had stood together against insurmountable odds. They cherished the victory, and the king had played a major role in the out-come.

Though it had been only seven years since the war had ended, the experiences of the conflict had already mellowed in memory into a golden time, when the camaraderie and pride in the accomplishments over-shadowed the wounds of battle. The valiant struggles of the king and the trust the nation had placed in him during the war years, were being fondly remembered.

For further information on the “The Reluctant Virgin,” a murder/mystery that encompasses historical fiction:  https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/29/chilling-murdermystery-showcases-toronto/

Author’s Home Page : https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

Link to purchase this book : http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000188306/The-Reluctant-Virgin.aspx

“The Reluctant Virgin” is available at any Chapters/Indigo store and can also be ordered in electronic versions.

 
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Posted by on February 4, 2012 in Toronto

 

Archival photos of Toronto’s old theatres give reality to historical novel

Photo_9   Photo_12

Imperial and Downtown Theatres on Yonge St.      The Yonge Theatre (today the Elgin)

Photo_34  Photo_33

            University Theatre on Bloor St.          Odeon Carlton on Carlton St., east of Yonge 

                         The above photos are from the Toronto Archives.

The historical/fiction novel “Arse Over Teakettle” relates a tale of Toronto during the 1940s, the golden age of Hollywood films and is sister medium, the radio. The story is about a family trying to cope with the horrors of the Second World War, when the reports of casualties from the frontlines of battle appeared each day in the newspapers. Food shortages, clothing drives, and preparing parcels to send to the troops were daily activities.

The central character of the book is a a young boy, Tom Hudson, and the reader views the events of the times through his eyes. The book recreates the city of the 1940s with amazing accuracy, seventy archival photos of the adding to the impression that this fictional tale actually occurred.

The movie houses, films, and radio programs of the day play an important role in the unfolding of the plot, since Tom and his friends are addicted to them. The Saturday afternoon matinee at the local theatre, and the evening radio programs were central to their lives. Their other passion was learning about the “secret activities” of the older boys. Scenes where Tom and his best friend, Shorty Bernstein, explore their sexuality are particularly amusing. After reading these sections, the old laneways of Toronto may never be viewed the same.

“Arse Over Teakettle” is the first book of The Toronto Trilogy.” The second book of the trilogy is also available in both paperback and electronic version. Readers who enjoy exploring Toronto’s yesteryears may particularly enjoy these books, both of which are over 500 pages. The third book in the trilogy will be available next year.

Link to the book “Arse Over Teakettle”: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000132634/Arse-Over-Teakettle.aspx

Link to more information about “Arse Over Teakettle” : https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/arse-over-teakettle/

9781450205313-Perfect.indd

 

“Arse Over Teakettle – Book One

of the The Toronto Trilogy” is

available at any Chapters/Indigo store

and can be ordered on-line in

electronic versions.

 

To view the Home Page for this blog : https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view blogs about the old movie houses of Toronto

The Bellevue Theatre on College Street that became the Lux Burlesque Theatre

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/?p=6648

Old movie houses of Toronto

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/06/27/old-movie-houses-of-toronto/

Attending the movies during Toronto’s golden age of cinema

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/attending-the-movies-in-toronto-during-the-golden-age-of-cinema/

The Odeon Carlton theatre on Carlton St., east of Yonge St.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/07/02/colour-photo-of-the-odeon-carlton-in-1956-a-marilyn-monroe-film-playing/

2011/07/02/colour-photo-of-the-odeon-carlton-in-1956-a-marilyn-monroe-film-playing/https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

The Victory burlesque and movie theatre on Spadina at Dundas:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/08/the-sinful-victory-burlesque-theatre-at-dundas-and-spadina/

The Shea’s Hippodrome Theatre on Bay St. near Queen

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/07/04/sheas-hippodrome-theatre-where-the-nathan-phillips-square-exists-today/

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/09/07/photographs-from-the-1950s-of-sheas-hippodrome-theatre-located-on-the-site-of-torontos-new-city-hall/

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/06/old-movie-houses-of-toronto-fond-memories-of-sheas-hippodrome/

Attending a matinee in the old movie houses of Toronto during the “golden age of cinema”

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/attending-a-movie-matinee-in-toronto-during-the-golden-age-of-cinema/

The University Theatre on Bloor St., west of Bay Street.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/the-opening-of-torontos-university-theatre-on-bloor-street/

Archival photos of the Imperial and Downtown Theatres on Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/04/archival-photos-of-torontos-old-theatres-give-reality-to-historical-novel/

 
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Posted by on February 4, 2012 in Toronto