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Monthly Archives: July 2012

Construction begins on Clarence Square on Spadina Avenue

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This photograph of Clarence Square was taken in May of 2012, when the chestnut spires were in bloom. Located on the east side of Spadina Avenue one block south of King Street, is one of Toronto’s most historic squares.

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Fencing has now been placed around the square to facilitate construction to improve the square.

The following is from Councillor Adam Vaughan’s newsletter, informing constituents about what is occurring in Clarence Square:

“Construction has started on improvements to Clarence Square Park, located at Wellington St W and Spadina Ave. This is a unique park that is deeply rooted in Toronto’s history. The Planning Partnership, which was also involved in the revitalization of Victoria Memorial Square, developed the plans for this park revitalization.

The work that is underway includes deep root fertilization and mulching to help improve the health of the trees in the park and to improve drainage. Eight trees are being removed with the approval of the City’s Urban Forestry division as part of the project, with 22 new trees of native species to be planted later in the construction process. A dog off-leash area is being created in the south portion of the park, along with a dog-accessible water fountain. The walkways will be rebuilt with pavers and lined with new benches, and a dedicated bike path will be created horizontally through the park, connecting Wellington St W and the Wellington-Spadina traffic signal. Construction is scheduled to be complete in Fall 2012. “

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Removing trees in Clarence Square, July 2012. I do not know why is was necessary to remove these trees.

I have spent much of my adult life researching Toronto. Despite the traffic jams and daily congestion, I find Toronto an exciting and vibrant city in which to live. I enjoy exploring its past through my writing. One of the books, “The Villages Within”, was nominated for the Toronto Heritage Awards. If interested in novels with a Toronto setting, descriptions of the books are available by following the link: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/22/toronto-author-publishes-seventh-novel/

They can be purchased in soft cover or electronic editions. All books are available at Chapters/Indigo and on Amazon.com. The electronic editions are less that $4 on Kobo and Kindle. Follow the links:

There Never Was a Better Time: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000056586/THERE-NEVER-WAS-A-BETTER-TIME.aspx

Arse Over Teakettle: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000132634/Arse-Over-Teakettle.aspx

The Reluctant Virgin; http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000188306/The-Reluctant-Virgin.aspx

The Villages Within: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000175211/The-Villages-Within.aspx

Author’s Home Page: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

Authors can be contacted at: tayloronhistory@gmail.com

 
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Posted by on July 31, 2012 in Toronto

 

Digging near Harbour Commission Building uncovers city’s ancient past

                        What does this excavation site reveal?

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Construction for a condo tower on Queen’s Quay on Toronto’s Harbourfront has revealed a little of the city’s long-forgotten past. The photo below was taken in July of 2012, looking north from Queen’s Quay. Almost lost from view in the centre-background of the picture is a building with columns across its facade.  It is behind at the top-front corner of the streetcar. It is the old Harbour Commission Building. As the condo rises, this building will no longer be visible from the Queen’s Quay. However, at one time, the building was beside the waters of the lake. All the land to the south of the Harbour Commission Building was created by landfill. 

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     The harbour Commission Building with the construction site in front of it.

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This picture shows the Harbour Commission Building in 1918. In that year, it was located beside the waters of the lake. Plans for the building were approved in 1916, and the architectural firm of Chapman and McGiffin hired. Because it was located at the water’s edge, a protective iron railing was installed in front of it, as well as the public docking facilities near the building. Harbour Commission engineers built the foundations for the Harbour Commission Building, but the masonry work was assigned to the firm of Archibald and Holmes. 

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The Harbour Commission Building after the landfill project was completed. The Royal York Hotel dominated the skyline, and the tower of the Old City Hall is visible at the top of Bay Street. The top two pictures are from the Toronto Archives.

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The excavation for the modern high-rise condo has dug into the area of landfill to the south of the Harbour Commission Building. Water has seeped into the site, as the digging is now below the level of the lake.

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A close-up view reveals the layers of sedimentary rock that in ancient times was beneath the water of Lake Iroquois. The lake at one time covered Toronto as far north as Davenport Road, which was the shoreline of this ancient lake. Above the layers of rock is the landfill that was dumped to reclaim the land from the harbour. 

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The excavation site for the condo, and the Harbour Commission Building to the south of it.

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view other posts about Toronto’s architectural gems:

The Waverly Hotel at Spadina and College

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/02/16/toronto-architectural-gemsthe-waverly-hotel-484-spadina/

The Bellevue Fire Station on College Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/02/14/torontos-architectural-gems-bellevue-fire-station/

The Postal Delivery Building, now a part of the Air Canada Centre (ACC)

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/02/12/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-postal-delivery-building-now-the-acc/

The Art Deco bus terminal at Bay and Dundas Streets.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/torontos-architectural-gems-art-deco-bus-terminal-on-bay-street/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The old Dominion Bank Building at King and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/the-old-dominion-bank-buildingnow-a-condo-hotel-at-one-king-st-west/

The Canada Life Building on University and Queen Street West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/exploring-torontos-architectural-gemsthe-canada-life-building/

Campbell House at the corner of Queen Street West and University Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/18/a-glimpse-at-the-interior-of-campbell-house-at-university-avenue-and-queen-street/

A study of Osgoode Hall

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-osgoode-hall/

Toronto’s first City Hall, now a part of the St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/torontos-first-city-hall-now-a-part-of-the-st-lawrence-market/

Toronto’s Draper Street, a time-tunnel into the 19th century

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/05/23/torontos-draper-street-is-akin-to-a-time-tunnel-into-the-past/

The Black Bull Tavern at Queen and Soho Streets, established in 1822

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/27/enjoying-torontos-historic-architectural-gems-queen-streets-black-bull-tavern/

History of the 1867 fence around Osgoode Hall on Queen Street West at York Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/14/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-cast-iron-fence-around-osgoode-hall/

Gathering around the radio as a child in the 1940s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/listening-to-the-radio-as-a-child-in-the-1940s-the-lone-ranger-the-shadow-etc/

The opening of the University Theatre on Bloor Street, west of Bay St.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/the-opening-of-torontos-university-theatre-on-bloor-street/

122 persons perish in the Noronic Disaster on Toronto’s waterfront in 1949

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/25/122-perish-in-torontos-noronic-disaster-horticultural-building-at-cne-used-as-morgue/

Historic Victoria Memorial Square where Toronto’s first cemetery was located, now hidden amid the Entertainment District

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/09/victoria-square-in-torontos-entertainment-district-is-a-gem/

Visiting one of Toronto’s best preserved 19th-century streets-Willcocks Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/20/visiting-torontos-best-preserved-nineteenth-century-street-willcocks-street/

The 1930s Water Maintenance Building on Brant Street, north of St. Andrew’s Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-water-maintenance-building-on-richmond-street-west/

Toronto’s architectural gems-photos of the Old City from a book published by the city in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-old-city-hall-photographed-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/torontos-architectural-gems-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems – the bank on the northeast corner of Queen West and Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/torontos-architectural-gemsbank-at-spadina-and-queen-west/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The St. Lawrence Hall on King Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-st-lawrence-hall/

Toronto’s streetcars through the past decades

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/26/memories-of-torontos-streetcars-of-yesteryear/

History of Trinity Bellwoods Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/the-history-and-beauty-of-trinity-bellwood-park/

A history of Toronto’s famous ferry boats to the Toronto Islands

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/remember-the-toronto-island-ferries-the-bluebell-primroseand-trillium/

Toronto’s Old City Hall at Bay and Queen Streets

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/22/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-old-city-hall/

The Reading Building, a warehouse loft on Spadina Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/20/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-reading-building-on-spadina/

The Darling Building on Spadina Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/19/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-darling-building-on-spadina/

The amazing Fashion Building on Spadina Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/12/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-amazing-fashion-building-on-spadina/

Toronto’s architectural gems – the Tower Building at Spadina and Adelaide Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/09/torontos-architectural-gemstower-building-at-spadina-and-adelaide/

The Balfour Building at 119 Spadina Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/07/20/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gemsthe-balfour-building-at-spadina-and-adelaide

The Robertson Building at 215 Spadina that houses the Dark Horse Espresso Bar

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/24/torontos-architectural-gemsrobertson-building-dark-horse-espresso-bar/

An architectural gem – Grossman’s Tavern at Spadina and Cecil Streets

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/11/08/architectural-gem-grossmans-tavern-at-377-9-spadina/Historic

History of the house that contains the Paul Magder Fur Shop at 202 Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/07/exploring-torontos-architectural-gemsthe-paul-magder-fur-shop-at-202-spadina-avenue/

An important historic building that disappeared from the northeast corner of Spadina and College

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/26/a-historic-building-that-disappeared-from-the-northeast-corner-spadina-and-college/

Historic bank building on northeast corner of Spadina and Queen West

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/torontos-architectural-gemsbank-at-spadina-and-queen-west/

History of the Backpackers’ Hotel at King and Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/31/history-of-the-backpackers-hotel-at-king-and-spadina/

Hamburger corner – Spadina and Queen Streets

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/10/torontos-hamburger-cornerwhere-is-it-and-why/

Lord Lansdowne Public School on Spadina Crescent

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/22/torontos-architectural-gems-lord-lansdowne-school-on-spadina-cres/

The Victory Burlesque Theatre at Dundas and Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/08/the-sinful-victory-burlesque-theatre-at-dundas-and-spadina/

The Dragon City Mall on the southwest corner of Dundas and Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/25/torontos-heritage-the-southwest-corner-of-queen-and-spadina/

Buildings on the west side of Spadina a short distance north of Queen Street.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/30/torontos-architectural-historyspadina-north-of-queen-kings-court/

History of the site of the Mcdonalds on northwest corner of Queen and Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/27/mcdonalds-at-queen-and-spadina-on-an-historic-site/

A former mansion at 235 Spadina that is now almost hidden from view.

ttps://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/07/04/torontos-architectural-gems-is-this-one-a-joke/

Military hero of the War of 1812 lived near corner of Spadina and Queen West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/01/military-hero-of-war-of-1812-lived-near-mcdonalds-at-queen-and-spadina/

 
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Posted by on July 29, 2012 in Toronto

 

Exploring Toronto’s architectural gems– row of shops that includes Jacob’s Hardware at 410 Queen Street West

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These four buildings at 408-414 Queen Street West, one block west of Spadina, were all constructed in the 1880s. The Cameron House is perhaps the most well known of the structures, but Jacob’s Hardware is also a unique institution on Queen West. Its friendly and knowledgeable staff harken back to earlier decades, when every community possessed a local hardware store that supplied their daily needs and offered expert advice on how to solve household problems. Today, it is rare that Jacob’s Hardware does not have the answers to your plumbing or electrical problems.

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With the exception of the wires and the hydro pole, the upper floors of the buildings appear much as they did in the 1880s. However,  I suspect that alterations may have occurred to the building second from the left (#412).

I have already published a post on this blog about the Cameron House at 408 Queen Street. To view this post follow the link : https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/07/27/history-of-the-building-that-houses-the-cameron-house-on-queen-st-w/

This post will concentrate on the other three buildings. The structure that houses Jacob’s Hardware at 410 Queen Street was completed in 1882. In that year Mr. T. Murray opened a provisions store. He and his wife lived above the store. This living arrangement was common to most shopkeepers on Queen Street in this era.

In 1882, the building that today houses Queen Video at 412 Queen Street was the tobacco shop of Mr. T. Martin, and his wife operated a registry office on the premises.

The fourth building examined is the Ton-ne Sushi restaurant at 414 Queen Street. It commenced its life in 1884 as a dry goods store operated by G. R. Grant.

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                                          Jacob’s Hardware

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                  Queen Video                                      Ton-ne Sushi

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The building at 414 Queen is perhaps the most architecturally interesting, with its gable window inset into the roof on the third floor.

I have spent much of my adult life researching Toronto. Despite the traffic jams and daily congestion, I find Toronto an exciting and vibrant city in which to live. The Pan Am pianos have added greatly to the summer of 2012.

I enjoy exploring the city’s past through my writing. One of the books, “The Villages Within”, was nominated for the Toronto Heritage Awards. If interested in novels with a Toronto setting, descriptions of the books are available by following the link: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/22/toronto-author-publishes-seventh-novel/

They can be purchased in soft cover or electronic editions. All books are available at Chapters/Indigo and on Amazon.com. The electronic editions are less that $4 on Kobo and Kindle. Follow the links:

There Never Was a Better Time: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000056586/THERE-NEVER-WAS-A-BETTER-TIME.aspx

Arse Over Teakettle: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000132634/Arse-Over-Teakettle.aspx

The Reluctant Virgin; http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000188306/The-Reluctant-Virgin.aspx

The Villages Within: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000175211/The-Villages-Within.aspx

Author’s Home Page: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

Authors can be contacted at: tayloronhistory@gmail.com

 
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Posted by on July 28, 2012 in Toronto

 

History of the building that houses the Cameron House on Queen St. W.

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The building that today houses the Cameron House was constructed in 1880. In that year, it was # 396 Queen Street, and the other half of the building, #398, was under construction. The land to the immediate west of the buildings was a vacant field. In 1881, Angus Cameron moved into #398 and opened a dry goods store on the premises. The other half of the building remained unoccupied. Cameron lived above the shop, his mother living nearby in one of the houses on the street that now bears her family name. By the year 1888, the shop became the “Ryan and Sullivan Tailor Shop.” In 1890, the store was vacant, but the following year, E. Hodd moved in and opened a furnishings shop. In 1895, the structure became the “John Burns Hotel.” In 1896, it became the “Cameron House.”  My information is based on the Toronto Directories. It does not match with the Wikipedia information, but I trust the Directories more.

The above photos is of the east facade of the Cameron House. I was unable to discover when the extension was added to the building, but it was likely when it was being operated as a hotel.

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I have spent much of my adult life researching Toronto. Despite the traffic jams and daily congestion, I find Toronto an exciting and vibrant city in which to live. I enjoy exploring its past through my writing. One of the books, “The Villages Within”, was nominated for the Toronto Heritage Awards. If interested in novels with a Toronto setting, descriptions of the books are available by following the link: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/22/toronto-author-publishes-seventh-novel/

They can be purchased in soft cover or electronic editions. All books are available at Chapters/Indigo and on Amazon.com. The electronic editions are less that $4 on Kobo and Kindle. Follow the links:

There Never Was a Better Time: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000056586/THERE-NEVER-WAS-A-BETTER-TIME.aspx

Arse Over Teakettle: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000132634/Arse-Over-Teakettle.aspx

The Reluctant Virgin; http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000188306/The-Reluctant-Virgin.aspx

The Villages Within: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000175211/The-Villages-Within.aspx

Author’s Home Page: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

Authors can be contacted at: tayloronhistory@gmail.com

 
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Posted by on July 27, 2012 in Toronto

 

Vanished building on Toronto’s Spadina Ave. is rediscovered

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Have you ever passed this building on the east side of Spadina, a short distance south of Queen Street? The nineteenth-century building behind the modern facade is entirely hidden from view. Only the peaked roof of the 1890s building behind the modern addition is now visible from the street.

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This is how the site appear in the last century. The Episcopal Church of St. Margaret’s was constructed at 161 Spadina Avenue in 1890. It ceased to function as a church in 1911 and was converted into a factory. It became site of the facilities of Caulfield, Burns and Gibson Ltd. When the above photo from the Toronto Archives was taken, about 1920, the church was already a factory.  The bells in the belfry had been removed.

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However, from the rear of the building, St. Margaret’s Church is clearly visible. The laneway on the north side of the church, where the truck was named parked Perry Lane. It was named after Mrs. Perry, who in the 1880s lived in one of the three small dwellings that were located on the north side of the laneway. Today the lane is named “Lot St. Lane.”

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Church windows on the north side           The old belfry that once held bells.

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This photo was taken in 1909, when St. Margaret’s remained a functioning church. A portion of it can be seen on the left-hand side of the picture. The view is of Spadina Avenue, looking south from Queen Street. In this picture, a structure is evident in the centre of the roadway, where there is a small fence and a pole. It is where stairs led down to a men’s underground washroom.

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view previous posts about movie houses of Toronto—old and new

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/links-to-toronto-old-movie-housestayloronhistory-com/

To view links to other posts placed on this blog about the history of Toronto and its heritage buildings:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/10/08/links-to-historic-architecture-of-torontotayloronhistory-com/

Recent publication entitled “Toronto’s Theatres and the Golden Age of the Silver Screen,” by the author of this blog. The publication explores 50 of Toronto’s old theatres and contains over 80 archival photographs of the facades, marquees and interiors of the theatres. It also relates anecdotes and stories from those who experienced these grand old movie houses.  

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                To place an order for this book:

https://www.historypress.net/catalogue/bookstore/books/Toronto-Theatres-and-the-Golden-Age-of-the-Silver-Screen/9781626194502 .

      Theatres Included in the Book

Chapter One – The Early Years—Nickelodeons and the First Theatres in Toronto

Theatorium (Red Mill) Theatre—Toronto’s First Movie Experience and First Permanent Movie Theatre, Auditorium (Avenue, PIckford), Colonial Theatre (the Bay), thePhotodome, Revue Theatre, Picture Palace (Royal George), Big Nickel (National, Rio), Madison Theatre (Midtown, Capri, Eden, Bloor Cinema, Bloor Street Hot Docs), Theatre Without a Name (Pastime, Prince Edward, Fox)

Chapter Two – The Great Movie Palaces – The End of the Nickelodeons

Loew’s Yonge Street (Elgin/Winter Garden), Shea’s Hippodrome, The Allen (Tivoli), Pantages (Imperial, Imperial Six, Ed Mirvish), Loew’s Uptown

Chapter Three – Smaller Theatres in the pre-1920s and 1920s

 Oakwood, Broadway, Carlton on Parliament Street, Victory on Yonge Street (Embassy, Astor, Showcase, Federal, New Yorker, Panasonic), Allan’s Danforth (Century, Titania, Music Hall), Parkdale, Alhambra (Baronet, Eve), St. Clair, Standard (Strand, Victory, Golden Harvest), Palace, Bedford (Park), Hudson (Mount Pleasant), Belsize (Crest, Regent), Runnymede

Chapter Four – Theatres During the 1930s, the Great Depression

Grant ,Hollywood, Oriole (Cinema, International Cinema), Eglinton, Casino, Radio City, Paramount, Scarboro, Paradise (Eve’s Paradise), State (Bloordale), Colony, Bellevue (Lux, Elektra, Lido), Kingsway, Pylon (Royal, Golden Princess), Metro

Chapter Five – Theatres in the 1940s – The Second World War and the Post-War Years

University, Odeon Fairlawn, Vaughan, Odeon Danforth, Glendale, Odeon Hyland, Nortown, Willow, Downtown, Odeon Carlton, Donlands, Biltmore, Odeon Humber, Town Cinema

Chapter Six – The 1950s Theatres

Savoy (Coronet), Westwood

Chapter Seven – Cineplex and Multi-screen Complexes

Cineplex Eaton Centre, Cineplex Odeon Varsity, Scotiabank Cineplex, Dundas Square Cineplex, The Bell Lightbox (TIFF)

 

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Toronto’s 41 Pan Am pianos played more often

Bermuda

This teenager is playing the “Bermuda” piano near the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) at the southwest corner of Bloor and Queen’s Park. Each of the 41 pianos represents a country that will participate in the Pan Am Games in 2015. Since they were originally placed around the city in early July, I have noticed that people are losing their reticence to perform in public. More and more people are sitting down and playing the instruments. It has been a highly successful project. 

Below are photos of other pianos.

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American piano-St. Andrew’s Park       Barbados-Queen and Spadina 

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           Costa Rica in TIFF                                Ecuador at Roy Thomson

I have spent much of my adult life researching Toronto. Despite the traffic jams and daily congestion, I find Toronto an exciting and vibrant city in which to live. The Pan Am pianos have added greatly to the summer of 2012.

I enjoy exploring the city’s past through my writing. One of the books, “The Villages Within”, was nominated for the Toronto Heritage Awards. If interested in novels with a Toronto setting, descriptions of the books are available by following the link: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/22/toronto-author-publishes-seventh-novel/

They can be purchased in soft cover or electronic editions. All books are available at Chapters/Indigo and on Amazon.com. The electronic editions are less that $4 on Kobo and Kindle. Follow the links:

There Never Was a Better Time: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000056586/THERE-NEVER-WAS-A-BETTER-TIME.aspx

Arse Over Teakettle: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000132634/Arse-Over-Teakettle.aspx

The Reluctant Virgin; http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000188306/The-Reluctant-Virgin.aspx

The Villages Within: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000175211/The-Villages-Within.aspx

Author’s Home Page: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

Authors can be contacted at: tayloronhistory@gmail.com

 
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Posted by on July 25, 2012 in Toronto

 

Toronto’s best street food is from a mobile pizza oven

Today I had pizza from a mobile oven located on the northeast corner of Spadina and King Streets. They would offer the pizza at this location every Tuesday between about 11 am and 6 pm. The wood-burning oven bakes the pizza employing the old-fashioned method of Naples. The Neapolitan-style crust is light, with a texture that is heavenly. Three choices of pizza are offered, and they change the varieties each week. Each pizza is made to order, and it requires only 90 seconds to bake as the oven has a heat of 700 degrees. The patio at “Fresh and Wild” is perfect for sitting to devour the pizza. The corner is noisy, but not so much as to detract from the experience. Beside, the street scene is fascinating.

In the cold months, they plan to erect a three-sided tent around the area where the oven is located, using the oven to provide heat for comfort. For further information, the owner’s web site is info@pizza700.ca

I live in this area, and consider the mobile oven and interesting addition to my neighbourhood. As I ate the delicious treat, I listened to the saxophone player on the southwest corner. Summer glorious summer. Who would ever have thought that the corner of Spadina and King would become so fascinating.

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My interest in this mobile pizza oven is partly generated by it being in my neighbourhood. However, because I place posts on my blog about the historic buildings in this area, I find it interesting to see new ideas for food blending in among the old buildings.

I have spent much of my adult life researching Toronto. Despite the traffic jams and daily congestion, I find Toronto an exciting and vibrant city in which to live. I enjoy exploring its past through my writing. One of the books, “The Villages Within”, was nominated for the Toronto Heritage Awards. If interested in novels with a Toronto setting, descriptions of the books are available by following the link: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/22/toronto-author-publishes-seventh-novel/

They can be purchased in soft cover or electronic editions. All books are available at Chapters/Indigo and on Amazon.com. The electronic editions are less that $4 on Kobo and Kindle. Follow the links:

There Never Was a Better Time: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000056586/THERE-NEVER-WAS-A-BETTER-TIME.aspx

Arse Over Teakettle: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000132634/Arse-Over-Teakettle.aspx

The Reluctant Virgin; http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000188306/The-Reluctant-Virgin.aspx

The Villages Within: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000175211/The-Villages-Within.aspx

Author’s Home Page: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

Authors can be contacted at: tayloronhistory@gmail.com

 
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Posted by on July 24, 2012 in Toronto