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Monthly Archives: August 2012

If Rob Ford is a turkey, at least he’s a butterball

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I enjoyed viewing the butter sculpture of Rob Ford in the Better Living Centre at the 2012 Canadian National Exhibition. The artist, Olenka Kleban, has truly captured the an excellent likeness of the mayor. She depicts him reading a Margaret Atwood novel. When I saw the sculpture, its left hand was not yet complete. The work is larger than life-size, as 500 pounds of butter were employed to complete the work.

Posts on this blog usually report on happenings throughout the city and examining the architectural history of Toronto. However, I thought that this “butterball” art was worthy of a post.

To view a post about other events and worthwhile sights at the 2012 Ex, follow the link:

 https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/28/try-viewing-the-2012-cne-through-new-eyes/

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For posts to other happenings around the city and details of Toronto’s architectural history, follow the links below.

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The closing of the two lanes on Yonge Street, August 2012.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/19/yonge-street-lane-closings-in-aug-2012-create-great-cafes-and-green-space/

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Bulwer Street – a street near Queen and Spadina that has disappeared yet remains in view.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/20/a-toronto-street-that-disappeared-but-yet-remains-in-view-bulwer-street/

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New up-scale meat market opens on Baldwin Street in Toronto’s Kensington Market – Sanagan’s Meat Locker

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/15/new-meat-market-opens-in-kensingtonsanagans-meat-locker/

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St. Mary’s Church at Adelaide and Bathurst Streets being uncovered from scaffolding for renovations.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/08/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gemsst-marys-roman-catholic-church/

For other post about Toronto and its history and architecture. Home Page https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
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Posted by on August 31, 2012 in Toronto

 

Toronto’s architectural history–Spadina north of Queen-King’s Court

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These buildings are on the west side of Spadina, a short distance north of Queen Street West. The building on the left is an early 1900s brick-and-beam warehouse. The structure on the right is King’s Court, a residential and commercial building that was erected in 1985.

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This picture is the same scene, but taken in 1985. It looks north on Spadina, when King’s Court was being constructed. Between the two buildings are two nineteenth-century homes that are being demolished. They were remnants of a time when Spadina Avenue was a prestigious residential avenue, where some of the grandest homes in the city were located. The site of the houses is now a paved parking lot. The historic photo is from the book “Spadina Avenue,” by Rosemary Donegan.

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The two nineteenth-century homes on Spadina, where there is now a parking lot. The King’s Court construction is in the background.

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view previous posts about other movie houses of Toronto—old and new

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/links-to-toronto-old-movie-housestayloronhistory-com/

To view links to other posts placed on this blog about the history of Toronto and its heritage buildings:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/10/08/links-to-historic-architecture-of-torontotayloronhistory-com/

Recent publication entitled “Toronto’s Theatres and the Golden Age of the Silver Screen,” by the author of this blog. The publication explores 50 of Toronto’s old theatres and contains over 80 archival photographs of the facades, marquees and interiors of the theatres. It also relates anecdotes and stories from those who experienced these grand old movie houses.  

                           cid_E474E4F9-11FC-42C9-AAAD-1B66D852

                To place an order for this book:

https://www.historypress.net/catalogue/bookstore/books/Toronto-Theatres-and-the-Golden-Age-of-the-Silver-Screen/9781626194502 .

      Theatres Included in the Book

Chapter One – The Early Years—Nickelodeons and the First Theatres in Toronto

Theatorium (Red Mill) Theatre—Toronto’s First Movie Experience and First Permanent Movie Theatre, Auditorium (Avenue, PIckford), Colonial Theatre (the Bay), thePhotodome, Revue Theatre, Picture Palace (Royal George), Big Nickel (National, Rio), Madison Theatre (Midtown, Capri, Eden, Bloor Cinema, Bloor Street Hot Docs), Theatre Without a Name (Pastime, Prince Edward, Fox)

Chapter Two – The Great Movie Palaces – The End of the Nickelodeons

Loew’s Yonge Street (Elgin/Winter Garden), Shea’s Hippodrome, The Allen (Tivoli), Pantages (Imperial, Imperial Six, Ed Mirvish), Loew’s Uptown

Chapter Three – Smaller Theatres in the pre-1920s and 1920s

 Oakwood, Broadway, Carlton on Parliament Street, Victory on Yonge Street (Embassy, Astor, Showcase, Federal, New Yorker, Panasonic), Allan’s Danforth (Century, Titania, Music Hall), Parkdale, Alhambra (Baronet, Eve), St. Clair, Standard (Strand, Victory, Golden Harvest), Palace, Bedford (Park), Hudson (Mount Pleasant), Belsize (Crest, Regent), Runnymede

Chapter Four – Theatres During the 1930s, the Great Depression

Grant ,Hollywood, Oriole (Cinema, International Cinema), Eglinton, Casino, Radio City, Paramount, Scarboro, Paradise (Eve’s Paradise), State (Bloordale), Colony, Bellevue (Lux, Elektra, Lido), Kingsway, Pylon (Royal, Golden Princess), Metro

Chapter Five – Theatres in the 1940s – The Second World War and the Post-War Years

University, Odeon Fairlawn, Vaughan, Odeon Danforth, Glendale, Odeon Hyland, Nortown, Willow, Downtown, Odeon Carlton, Donlands, Biltmore, Odeon Humber, Town Cinema

Chapter Six – The 1950s Theatres

Savoy (Coronet), Westwood

Chapter Seven – Cineplex and Multi-screen Complexes

Cineplex Eaton Centre, Cineplex Odeon Varsity, Scotiabank Cineplex, Dundas Square Cineplex, The Bell Lightbox (TIFF)

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on August 30, 2012 in Toronto

 

Entertainment District’s trendy new eatery – “Gusto”- on Portland Street

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I usually offer posts on this blog about the historic architecture of Toronto. On a few occasions, I have departed from my usual format to include eateries located among the historic buildings of the Entertainment District. Although I am not qualified to be a food critic, I know good food when I experience it, and have no difficulty recognizing superior service. In the case of “Gusto,” on Portland Street, it is great to see a restaurant employing a building from an earlier era, renovating it, and creating a trendy place where its customers can enjoy an eclectic mixture of the past and present. Gusto opened several months ago, but I tried it for the first time this week. It has already become one of the most popular restaurants in the area.

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I remember when this site on Portland Street, a short distance north of Queen Street was an automotive repair shop. The door where the autos entered has been retained. It opens in warm weather to allow the indoor and outdoor spaces to integrate. It can be seen in the picture above, behind the two white umbrellas. On roof of the shop there is an outdoor dining area where diners are able to enjoy warm summer evenings. The restaurant offers Italian fare, with many pasta dishes and a variety of pizzas from a wood-fired oven.

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This picture shows patio on the front of the restaurant and the garage door of the old automotive shop.

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                                                The roof patio at Gusto

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Gasoline and oil cans above the bar and signs from the automotive shop decorate the interior

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Please forgive me for photographing the food, but the calamari was light, crisp and cooked to perfection.

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The salmon salad was excellent, and the meatball pizza was equally as good, although I found the meatballs a bit too heavy.

One of the best features of the restaurant is offering the wine at the price of $1 per ounce. It is a reasonable price, and allows each diner to order the exact amount they desire. However, I was not impressed with the restaurant reservation service. No phone reservations are allowed, and if you go online to gusto101.ca you will discover that they only offer a limited number of tables, and the remainder are on a first-come-first-served basis. This means that if you do not receive a reservation, you can waste your time going to the restaurant only to find that a table is not available. I realize that this annoying habit from New York is designed to create a “buzz,” where patrons are turned away to create an aura of desirability. It may be okay for clubs, but for restaurants I find the system simply discourteous to the customers.

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However, our displeasure at the reservation system disappeared when we sat down at the table under an umbrella in the patio, and luxuriated in the pleasure of the atmosphere and the the gorgeous summer weather. The service we received from our waiter, whose name was Nikesh, was friendly and professional. He was efficient and although he never hovered, was always quick to supply our needs.  In the future, he is certain to become a Bollywood star and be lost to the hospitality industry. 

For a post about a gourmet street food in the Entertainment District.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/28/wood-burning-pizza-oven-is-an-up-scale-food-hit-at-king-and-spadina/

The Home Page for this blog : https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
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Posted by on August 29, 2012 in Toronto

 

Out-door wood-burning pizza oven is an up-scale food hit at King and Spadina

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The outdoor pizza oven at King and Spadina is an up-scale addition to the “street food” scene of the city. Every Tuesday they bring the mobile oven to the northeast corner of the intersection and fire up the oven to 700 degrees. It requires only 90 seconds to cook an individual-size pizza. Last week I arrived on the scene at 1:30 pm, and they were sold out. The gourmet pizza, with a crust and sauce that must be sampled to be believed, is obviously very popular.

My posts usually examine historic buildings and architectural history, but ever since the pizza arrived, I arrange my photographic outings and research trips to coincide with the availability of the pizza. The picture above is the pepperoni pizza. It is $13 and I considered it well worth the money.

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                                                      Preparing the pizza

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Checking the pizza inside the mobile oven, located in the patio beside “Fresh and Wild.” The pizza can be carried away in a box or eaten at a table in the patio.

To view my original post about the pizza oven, follow the link: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/07/24/mobile-pizza-oven-is-a-gourmet-treat-among-torontos-street-foods/

For other posts about Toronto’s architectural history and happenings throughout the city: follow the links” :

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The history of the southwest corner of Dundas and Spadina where the China Mall is today located.

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               Rob Ford in butter rather than the proverbial “hot water.”

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/23/rob-ford-in-butter-rather-than-the-proverbial-hot-water/

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The closing of the two lanes on Yonge Street, August 2012.

Bulwer Street – a street near Queen and Spadina that has disappeared yet remains in view.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/20/a-toronto-street-that-disappeared-but-yet-remains-in-view-bulwer-street/

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/25/torontos-heritage-the-southwest-corner-of-queen-and-spadina/

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The historic importance of the site of the McDonald’s at the northwest corner of Queen and Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/27/mcdonalds-at-queen-and-spadina-on-an-historic-site/

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St. Mary’s Church at Adelaide and Bathurst Streets being uncovered from scaffolding for renovations.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/08/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gemsst-marys-roman-catholic-church/

For other post about Toronto and its history and architecture. Home Page https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
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Posted by on August 28, 2012 in Toronto

 

Try viewing the 2012 CNE through new eyes

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My enthusiasm for the Ex has definitely waned during the last few years. Having attended the CNE for many decades, I remember its “glory“ days when it was the highlight of the end of summer. I have continued to attend the Ex, but I must admit that it has been more because of nostalgia. I decided that when I attended the Ex this year, I would push memories of former visits from my mind and instead of lamenting what was no longer there, examine what is there. This change of attitude made an enormous difference to my visit. Sometimes it is good to examine with fresh eyes things are all too familiar to you

After all, as this year was the 100th anniversary of the Calgary Stampede, it drew the largest crowd ever – 1.4 million visitors. The CNE attracted 1.31 million in 2011. The Ex must have something going for it to attract such enormous crowds.

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This picture was taken at 11 am, but when I passed by at 3pm, the grounds remained clean and free of litter. I found that the displays in many of the buildings did not interest me, but wandering the grounds amid the floral displays and lush plantings was great.

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The Food Building, built in 1954, with its fountain and its sculptures is always a delight. I consumed treats that during the remainder of the year I usually avoid. Why not? It’s my day at the fair, and a chance to be a kid again.

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The 1907 Music Building (left) and the 1912 Fire Hall and Police Station (right0 had historic signs and information about their history.

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I also enjoyed reading other plaques that were scattered throughout the grounds.

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The 1905 Press Building, and one of the swans from Ontario Place that is now used as a planter. These swans are throughout the grounds. Children were climbing on them and sitting in the seats where the riders once sat.

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I am too old for the children’s midway, but I enjoyed the colourful sights and the laughter of its young patrons.

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However, the Rib-Fest that is available every day was certainly within my sphere of enjoyment.

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                                          The sculptures in sand were amazing.

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           I was very interested in the new LRT cars that are to be on Eglinton Line 

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The sculptured portrayal of Rob Ford in butter was interesting and amusing. It was a change to see the mayor in butter rather than “hot water.” It gave new meaning to the term “Butterball.”

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The Sky Ride, built to replace the former Alpine Ride, was a big hit with me. I enjoyed the view of the midway and the surrounding grounds, as well as the city skyline.

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The colourful midway games of chance and the rides never seem to lose their appeal. I don’t play them, but I enjoyed watching. The Bingo tent was also crowded.

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I enjoyed my day to such an extent that I returned after dark to take some night pictures.

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                 The Ferris Wheel                               The Princess Margaret Fountain

To view other posts about the CNE, follow the links:

Memories of the CNE of yesteryears.

tps://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/22/memories-of-the-cnetoday-and-yesterday/

The old CNE fountain was a copy of those in Rome’s St. Peter’s Square

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/09/05/the-fountain-at-the-cne/

Ten suggestions to improve the CNE

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/09/05/ten-suggestion-to-make-the-cne-great/

Attending the 2011 Ex.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/25/whats-it-like-to-attend-the-cne-in-2011-in-comparison-with-yesteryear/

Memories and photos of the Grandstand shows of the 1950s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/09/03/the-magnificent-grandstand-shows-of-the-1950s/

Postcard views of the CNE from the 1940s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/29/postcard-views-of-the-1947-cne-part-one/

More postcard views of the CNE from the 1940s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/30/postcard-views-of-the-1947-cne-part-two/

To view the Home Page and Blog archives : https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 

 
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Posted by on August 28, 2012 in Toronto

 

McDonald’s at Queen and Spadina on an historic site

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When gazing at the intersection at Queen and Spadina, where a McDonald’s is located on the northwest corner, it is difficult to believe that this site was at one time beyond the western boundary of the city. When Toronto was incorporated in 1834, and its name changed to York, the city only extended as far as Peter Street.

A map of 1797 reveals that the site of the intersection was originally part of the Military Reserve, attached to Fort York. As late as 1867, the northwest corner of Queen and Spadina was part of a large estate named “The Meadows.” There were three structures on the property, likely a house, a barn, and another out-building.

An 1890s map shows that the land on the north side of Queen had been divided into building lots. Lot #1 was the site of today’s MacDonald’s, and its postal number was 432. In 1908, the Mary Pickford Theatre was constructed on the site. It was renamed the Avenue theatre in 1913, but its name reverted to its original title in 1915.

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The above photo from the Toronto Archives looks north on Spadina from the intersection at Queen Street on 23 September 1910. The building on the right-hand side remains today, and is a branch of the CIBC. The building on the left-hand side is the Mary Pickford Theatre. The tower on the theatre complemented the one on the southeast corner, which remains in existence today and is now another hamburger outlet.

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This 1910 photo from the Toronto Archives is a view of Queen Street looking west toward Spadina. On the southeast corner of Spadina and Queen is the building that remains in existence today, with its turret that complemented the one of the Mary Pickford Theatre. On the left-hand side of the photo is the south-facing facade of the theatre. On the southwest corner, where a bank is now located, was a coal-yard in 1910.

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The entrance of the Mary Pickford Theatre in the early months of 1910. The movie the “Heroine of Mafeking” was released on 11 December 1909. The entrance of today’s MacDonald’s is where the support pillar in the foreground is located. During the First World War, the theatre entertained the troops that were training in Toronto prior to being shipped overseas.

The theatre was owned by C. Rotenberg, and continued to operate throughout the 1930s, showing an eclectic mixture of films, from Hollywood movies to those from the Soviet Union. The third floor of the theatre housed the Leonard Athletic Centre, where local boxers like Sammy Luftspring trained. In the 1950s the theatre became the Variety Theatre and screened controversial films such as “Salt of the Earth,” which had been banned in the U.S. during the McCarthy witch hunt.

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The picture above shows Mary Pickford, the famous movie star, in front of the home where she was born in 1892, at 211 University Avenue. Sick Children’s Hospital is now on the site, and an historic plaque marks the location of he birthplace. Mary Pickford married Douglas Fairbanks in 1920. This photo was taken on 24 March 1924, and is from the Toronto Archives.

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                                                                                 Mary Pickford

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In the 1950s the theatre became a bargain emporium named “Bargain Benny’s” that was famous for its extravagant signs and wall paintings. This photo was taken in 1969, when the store was highly popular with downtown shoppers.

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In 1972 the previous site of the Mary Pickford Theatre and later the home of Bargain Benny’s, was demolished. This photo depicts the workmen removing the tower from the structure. The above tow photos are from the book, “Spadina Avenue,” by Rosemary Donegan.

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                                    Queen and Spadina after dark.

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view previous posts about movie houses of Toronto—old and new

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/links-to-toronto-old-movie-housestayloronhistory-com/

To view links to other posts placed on this blog about the history of Toronto and its heritage buildings:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/10/08/links-to-historic-architecture-of-torontotayloronhistory-com/

Recent publication entitled “Toronto’s Theatres and the Golden Age of the Silver Screen,” by the author of this blog. The publication explores 50 of Toronto’s old theatres and contains over 80 archival photographs of the facades, marquees and interiors of the theatres. It also relates anecdotes and stories from those who experienced these grand old movie houses.  

                           cid_E474E4F9-11FC-42C9-AAAD-1B66D852

                To place an order for this book:

https://www.historypress.net/catalogue/bookstore/books/Toronto-Theatres-and-the-Golden-Age-of-the-Silver-Screen/9781626194502 .

      Theatres Included in the Book

Chapter One – The Early Years—Nickelodeons and the First Theatres in Toronto

Theatorium (Red Mill) Theatre—Toronto’s First Movie Experience and First Permanent Movie Theatre, Auditorium (Avenue, PIckford), Colonial Theatre (the Bay), thePhotodome, Revue Theatre, Picture Palace (Royal George), Big Nickel (National, Rio), Madison Theatre (Midtown, Capri, Eden, Bloor Cinema, Bloor Street Hot Docs), Theatre Without a Name (Pastime, Prince Edward, Fox)

Chapter Two – The Great Movie Palaces – The End of the Nickelodeons

Loew’s Yonge Street (Elgin/Winter Garden), Shea’s Hippodrome, The Allen (Tivoli), Pantages (Imperial, Imperial Six, Ed Mirvish), Loew’s Uptown

Chapter Three – Smaller Theatres in the pre-1920s and 1920s

 Oakwood, Broadway, Carlton on Parliament Street, Victory on Yonge Street (Embassy, Astor, Showcase, Federal, New Yorker, Panasonic), Allan’s Danforth (Century, Titania, Music Hall), Parkdale, Alhambra (Baronet, Eve), St. Clair, Standard (Strand, Victory, Golden Harvest), Palace, Bedford (Park), Hudson (Mount Pleasant), Belsize (Crest, Regent), Runnymede

Chapter Four – Theatres During the 1930s, the Great Depression

Grant ,Hollywood, Oriole (Cinema, International Cinema), Eglinton, Casino, Radio City, Paramount, Scarboro, Paradise (Eve’s Paradise), State (Bloordale), Colony, Bellevue (Lux, Elektra, Lido), Kingsway, Pylon (Royal, Golden Princess), Metro

Chapter Five – Theatres in the 1940s – The Second World War and the Post-War Years

University, Odeon Fairlawn, Vaughan, Odeon Danforth, Glendale, Odeon Hyland, Nortown, Willow, Downtown, Odeon Carlton, Donlands, Biltmore, Odeon Humber, Town Cinema

Chapter Six – The 1950s Theatres

Savoy (Coronet), Westwood

Chapter Seven – Cineplex and Multi-screen Complexes

Cineplex Eaton Centre, Cineplex Odeon Varsity, Scotiabank Cineplex, Dundas Square Cineplex, The Bell Lightbox (TIFF)

 

 

 

 

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Toronto’s heritage–history of the southwest corner of Dundas and Spadina

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  The Dragon City Mall on the southwest corner of Dundas and Spadina.

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For over 100 years, St. Phillip’s Anglican church was on the site of today’s Dragon City Mall. The above photo was taken in the 1940s. At one time the land was part of the estate of the Denison Family, which owned the land where the Kensington Market is located today. The Anglican Church was designed by Arthur Dension, a plain quadrangular red-brick structure which opened in January of 1884, at a cost of $17,000. The building was purchased by the Roman Catholic  Archdiocese in 1943, and the church as 282 Spadina became St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church.  In 1956, during the Hungarian uprisings, the building became the organizational centre for the refugee airlift.

When the Hungarian population declined in the area, the church was sold and it was demolished in the late 1980s. 

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Painting of a scene looking west on Dundas Street toward Spadina, from Huron Street in the 1970s. The St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church is visible in the background.

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        The southwest corner of Dundas and Spadina in August of 2012.

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view previous posts about movie houses of Toronto—old and new

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/links-to-toronto-old-movie-housestayloronhistory-com/

To view links to other posts placed on this blog about the history of Toronto and its heritage buildings:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/10/08/links-to-historic-architecture-of-torontotayloronhistory-com/

Recent publication entitled “Toronto’s Theatres and the Golden Age of the Silver Screen,” by the author of this blog. The publication explores 50 of Toronto’s old theatres and contains over 80 archival photographs of the facades, marquees and interiors of the theatres. It also relates anecdotes and stories from those who experienced these grand old movie houses.  

                           cid_E474E4F9-11FC-42C9-AAAD-1B66D852

                To place an order for this book:

https://www.historypress.net/catalogue/bookstore/books/Toronto-Theatres-and-the-Golden-Age-of-the-Silver-Screen/9781626194502 .

      Theatres Included in the Book

Chapter One – The Early Years—Nickelodeons and the First Theatres in Toronto

Theatorium (Red Mill) Theatre—Toronto’s First Movie Experience and First Permanent Movie Theatre, Auditorium (Avenue, PIckford), Colonial Theatre (the Bay), thePhotodome, Revue Theatre, Picture Palace (Royal George), Big Nickel (National, Rio), Madison Theatre (Midtown, Capri, Eden, Bloor Cinema, Bloor Street Hot Docs), Theatre Without a Name (Pastime, Prince Edward, Fox)

Chapter Two – The Great Movie Palaces – The End of the Nickelodeons

Loew’s Yonge Street (Elgin/Winter Garden), Shea’s Hippodrome, The Allen (Tivoli), Pantages (Imperial, Imperial Six, Ed Mirvish), Loew’s Uptown

Chapter Three – Smaller Theatres in the pre-1920s and 1920s

 Oakwood, Broadway, Carlton on Parliament Street, Victory on Yonge Street (Embassy, Astor, Showcase, Federal, New Yorker, Panasonic), Allan’s Danforth (Century, Titania, Music Hall), Parkdale, Alhambra (Baronet, Eve), St. Clair, Standard (Strand, Victory, Golden Harvest), Palace, Bedford (Park), Hudson (Mount Pleasant), Belsize (Crest, Regent), Runnymede

Chapter Four – Theatres During the 1930s, the Great Depression

Grant ,Hollywood, Oriole (Cinema, International Cinema), Eglinton, Casino, Radio City, Paramount, Scarboro, Paradise (Eve’s Paradise), State (Bloordale), Colony, Bellevue (Lux, Elektra, Lido), Kingsway, Pylon (Royal, Golden Princess), Metro

Chapter Five – Theatres in the 1940s – The Second World War and the Post-War Years

University, Odeon Fairlawn, Vaughan, Odeon Danforth, Glendale, Odeon Hyland, Nortown, Willow, Downtown, Odeon Carlton, Donlands, Biltmore, Odeon Humber, Town Cinema

Chapter Six – The 1950s Theatres

Savoy (Coronet), Westwood

Chapter Seven – Cineplex and Multi-screen Complexes

Cineplex Eaton Centre, Cineplex Odeon Varsity, Scotiabank Cineplex, Dundas Square Cineplex, The Bell Lightbox (TIFF)

 
 

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