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Monthly Archives: December 2012

Final post on blog that had 26,000 hits in 2012–”Toronto amid the snow”

This is my final post of the year on this blog. The total number of hits on this blog during 2012 was 26,000. I hope that during the past year, a few Torontonians have viewed the city though different eyes and appreciated anew the many interesting buildings that Toronto possesses. Obviously my opinion is prejudiced, but I truly believe that our city is one of the best urban areas in the world to call home. Its past is rich, and its future is promising. I never tire of researching its yesteryears and photographing its many fascinating streets and historic structures.

It is fitting that my final post should be about snow. Downtown Toronto was transformed during the final week of December this year. It was the first time in over two years that the city experienced an accumulation of snow that lasted more than a day or two. Some of the historic buildings appeared quite different when surrounded by a wreath of white. Below are a few of my favourite pictures taken of the city’s iconic buildings during December of 2012.

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Metropolitan United Church in McGill Square on Queen Street East

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                     Toronto’s New City Hall on Queen Street West

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The grounds of Osgoode Hall, its east wing dating from 1829, with the 1899 Romanesque City Hall and clock tower in the background

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          South facade of Osgoode Hall on Queen Street near York Street.

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    The Art Deco 1929-1931 Canada Life Building on University Avenue

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                      The 1867 cast iron fence of Osgoode Hall

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The 1821 Campbell House at the corner of University Avenue and Queen Street West.

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The Grange, the 1817 home of D’Arsy Boulton Jr. located at the rear of the AGO. It was Toronto’s first art gallery

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The Black Bull Tavern at 298 Queen West, at Soho Streets, established in 1822.

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The Tower of the 1844 St. George the Martyr Anglican Church on John Street

To view other posts about Toronto’s past and its historic buildings:

Toronto’s Draper Street, a time-tunnel into the 19th century

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/05/23/torontos-draper-street-is-akin-to-a-time-tunnel-into-the-past/

The Black Bull Tavern at Queen and Soho Streets, established in 1822

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/27/enjoying-torontos-historic-architectural-gems-queen-streets-black-bull-tavern/

History of the 1867 fence around Osgoode Hall on Queen Street West at York Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/14/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-cast-iron-fence-around-osgoode-hall/

Gathering around the radio as a child in the 1940s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/listening-to-the-radio-as-a-child-in-the-1940s-the-lone-ranger-the-shadow-etc/

The opening of the University Theatre on Bloor Street, west of Bay St.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/the-opening-of-torontos-university-theatre-on-bloor-street/

122 persons perish in the Noronic Disaster on Toronto’s waterfront in 1949

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/25/122-perish-in-torontos-noronic-disaster-horticultural-building-at-cne-used-as-morgue/

Historic Victoria Memorial Square where Toronto’s first cemetery was located, now hidden amid the Entertainment District

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/09/victoria-square-in-torontos-entertainment-district-is-a-gem/

Visiting one of Toronto’s best preserved 19th-century streets-Willcocks Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/20/visiting-torontos-best-preserved-nineteenth-century-street-willcocks-street/

The Backpackers’ Hotel at Spadina and King St. West

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/31/history-of-the-backpackers-hotel-at-king-and-spadina/

The 1930s Water Maintenance Building on Brant Street, north of St. Andrew’s Park 

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-water-maintenance-building-on-richmond-street-west/

Toronto’s architectural gems-photos of the Old City from a book published by the city in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-old-city-hall-photographed-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/torontos-architectural-gems-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems – the bank on the northeast corner of Queen West and Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/torontos-architectural-gemsbank-at-spadina-and-queen-west/

Military hero of the War of 1812 lived near corner of Spadina and Queen West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/01/military-hero-of-war-of-1812-lived-near-mcdonalds-at-queen-and-spadina/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The old Dominion Bank Building at King and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/the-old-dominion-bank-buildingnow-a-condo-hotel-at-one-king-st-west/

The Canada Life Building on University and Queen Street West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/exploring-torontos-architectural-gemsthe-canada-life-building/

Campbell House at the corner of Queen Street West and University Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/18/a-glimpse-at-the-interior-of-campbell-house-at-university-avenue-and-queen-street/

A study of Osgoode Hall

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-osgoode-hall/

Toronto’s first City Hall, now a part of the St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/torontos-first-city-hall-now-a-part-of-the-st-lawrence-market/

The St. Lawrence Hall on King Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-st-lawrence-hall/

Toronto’s streetcars through the past decades

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/26/memories-of-torontos-streetcars-of-yesteryear/

History of Trinity Bellwoods Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/the-history-and-beauty-of-trinity-bellwood-park/

A history of Toronto’s famous ferry boats to the Toronto Islands

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/remember-the-toronto-island-ferries-the-bluebell-primroseand-trillium/

Toronto’s Old City Hall at Bay and Queen Streets

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/22/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-old-city-hall/

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
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Posted by on December 31, 2012 in Toronto

 

Graffiti murals in Toronto amid the winter snow-2012

The snow that fell in Toronto in December of 2012 was the first real accumulation that has descended on the city in over two years. I did not miss the opportunity to walk the streets and alleys of my neighbourhood to view familiar scenes that have been given a new setting. I believe that the colours of the some of the murals are more spectacular when bathed in the reflections cast by the snow. The alleys appear more charming, though I admit that one of the reasons may be that the litter and garbage thrown in these laneways are buried under a cover of white. Although snow on the streets may be the enemy of drivers, it is certainly friendly to the hidden outdoor spaces within the city where graffiti artists like Uber5000 thrive.

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The year’s most ambitious graffiti mural during 2012 by Uber5000. This is an office building in Graffiti Alley, and was a commissioned work for the young artist from Nova Scotia.

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Graffiti Alley, which is parallel to Richmond Street, with the condo 500 Richmond and the CN Tower in the background.

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McDougall Alley that is between Queen Street West and Richmond Streets. This view looks north to Queen Street.

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                               Graffiti Alley looking east toward Portland Street

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Graffiti Alley looking west toward Bathurst Street, with the mural by Uber5000 on the north wall of the office building.

To view others posts about the Toronto graffiti scene:

Uber5000 painting a building in Graffiti Alley

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/11/08/uber5000-has-new-graffiti-art-in-mcdougall-lane/

New commissioned mural by Uber5000 at 74 Denison Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/11/04/new-graffiti-mural-by-uber5000-on-dennison-avenue/

New mural on McCaul Street has traces of Diego Rivera

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/11/03/new-mccaul-st-mural-has-traces-of-diego-rivera/

Black and white graffiti in Kensington Market is unique

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/11/02/new-black-and-white-graffiti-art-in-kensington-market-is-unique/

McDougall Lane has a new graffiti display (Nov. 2012)

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/11/01/mcdougall-alley-has-a-new-display-of-graffiti-art/

The graffiti-decorated “hug-me-tree” on Queen Street West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/25/queen-street-wests-graffiti-adorned-hug-me-tree/

Graffiti in a laneway amid the colours of autumn

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/23/graffiti-amid-autumn-in-the-city/

A mural in the Kensington Market, with tongue-in-cheek humour:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/17/clever-humorous-graffiti-in-the-kensington-market/

In July of 2011, I placed a post on this blog about the abstract expressionists. At that time, there was an exhibition of their work at the AGO. I received comments from readers who strongly disagreed with the post. Their opinions were indeed valid, but the ideas expressed in the post may also have validity. To view this post:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/06/abstract-expressionist-masters-at-the-ago-waste-of-time-or-meaningful/

In August of 2012 I placed another post in which I compared the work of the graffiti artist Uber5000 to the abstract expressionists. This too became a controversial post.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/17/in-graffiti-alley-torontos-artists-put-to-shame-new-york-abstract-expressionists/

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
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Posted by on December 31, 2012 in Toronto

 

Dreamin’ of a white New Year’s?

Although we did not have a white Christmas, we will likely have a white New Year’s in Toronto. Somehow, it does not have quite the same appeal.

This year, I have not missed an opportunity to photograph the streets in my neighbourhood as it has become rare to view them covered with snow. I might be tempting fate, as perhaps the winter months a head will provide more than ample opportunities to witness snow-clogged streets. I know that by March everyone will have had enough of the “white stuff.”

Happy New Year’s 2013.

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                     St. Andrew’s Park, looking west from Brant Street

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Camden Street, looking east toward Spadina Avenue, which is at the end of the street.

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View from the terrace, 29 December 2012. It was snowing when this picture was taken, so the CN Tower is partially obscured. The view looks south toward Adelaide Street.

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The old Gurney Iron Works on the northeast corner of Brant and King Street West, on the evening of 28 December, the trees wrapped with Christmas lights. As King Street has much vehicle traffic, the snow has melted, but it remains beside the sidewalk and in the curb.

To view posts about New Year’s in Toronto throughout the years.

New Year’s Eve in Toronto in 1945

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/28/new-years-eve-in-toronto-1945/

New Year’s Eve in Toronto compared to yesteryears

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/29/new-years-eve-in-toronto-2012-compared-to-yesteryears/

Link to the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
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Posted by on December 29, 2012 in Toronto

 

New Year’s Eve in Toronto-2012-compared to yesteryears

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As I watch the fireworks on New Year’s Eve, I am more acutely aware of the passage of time than on my birthdays. One of the true blessings of childhood was that I never thought about the past. I was too preoccupied with the coming year, when I would be another year older. I still anticipate the future enthusiastically, but I no longer enjoy adding to my age.

I believe that the Toronto of today is more vibrant, interesting, and tolerant than it was when I was a child. Our city is now one of the most ethnically diverse urban areas in the world. It does not just tolerate differences in life-style and religious faith, but embraces them. Toronto also accepts that some people do not identify with any religious faith. Immigrants have helped turn Toronto into one of the gastronomic centres of the world. It is a great time to live in the city. I feel privileged that I have been able to participate in the age of mass communication and social media as it provides endless opportunities to learn about others and reach out to them. The changes in mass transportation are another marvel of our modern world. I can have coffee on a cold winter morning in Toronto, watch the snow drift past my window, and in the late afternoon be in the heat of the tropics, sipping on a rum-filled drink.

When I was a child, the world was a different place. In every century, in every country, if a person lives long enough, they eventually make this claim. Because the concept is universally true, its truth is not diminished. When I tip my glass to toast the New Year, although it is a moment to celebration the future, I remember the past and the world of my childhood. In those days, our street was akin to a small village. We knew everyone for several city blocks in either direction. We had our own corner store to purchase penny-candy, a grocery store for our daily needs, drug store, local movie theatre, and churches within walking distance. The same people had lived our street year after year, and if someone moved away or died, they created a hole in the fabric of our village scene. On Halloween, we knew who would answer the door of the houses, and were aware who handed out the best treats. On Christmas, we knew who would purchase a tree of balsam and who would buy a pine or spruce.  There was predictability to life that our transient society of today lacks.

On New Year’s Eve, in our neighbourhood, it was rare for anyone to journey downtown to a restaurant or club. Few could afford such a luxury. Some might go to the local movie theatre, but before midnight, they returned home. When the clock struck twelve, everyone left their place by the radio and went outside on the veranda to welcome in the New Year. People banged pots and pans together, blew on a brass instrument, or employed anything they could find to make a noise. Sometimes, they even used the lids of garbage cans. They shouted “Happy New Year” as loudly as possible and shook hands with those who lived in the houses nearby. Then, within three or four minutes, the cold temperatures forced everyone back indoors, where they resumed the celebration. Sadly, this tradition has disappeared from the urban scene. It has been a long time since I have seen anyone in residential areas go outside to wish their neighbours “Happy New Year.”

However, during the past few years, on New Year’s Eve in our downtown condo, a small group that lives within the building go out on our balcony to make noise at midnight. Alas, our racket is the only sound in the neighbourhood. No one else ever ventures outside in the cold to welcome in the New Year. Perhaps this year will be different!

In yesteryears in Toronto, on our village/street, it was possible to greet your neighbours personally on New Year’s Eve as you knew them well, having shared their joys and sorrows throughout the previous year. You chatted with them daily in the local grocery store, passed them frequently as you walked along the sidewalks of the neighbourhood, and complained together on stormy days as you shovelled the deep drifts of snow.  No one drove to a plaza where they knew no one or shopped in a huge supermarket where there were no opportunities to chat with people. People tended to work at the same job, often with the same company, throughout most of their career. They remained in the same house for decades. Today, people change jobs and living space frequently. These changes in society have advantages, but also drawbacks. We have gained much throughout the previous decades, we have also lost some things that were worthwhile.

As we approach the new year, may we all create new memories during 2013 that we will fondly cherish in the years ahead.

Happy New Year! 

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The two objects in the above picture are noise-makers that have been in my family for many years. They were employed when I was a child to make noise on New Year’s Eve, when we went out on the veranda. The old trumpet was my dad’s. He was a member of McCormick’s Dance Orchestra in the 1930s, when he played during the Depression years to supplement the family income. The grey object is a conch shell that was owned by my grandfather when he fished on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, in the early days of the 20th century. The tip of the shell had been removed to create a hole, turning the shell into a horn-like instrument. A person places his/her lips on the hole and blows to create a loud, hollow sound. When my grandfather was fishing in a dory (small boat), in the fog, he used the conch shell to signal his position to the schooner. The conch shell has been in my family for over 100 years. These are the same two objects that we employ on the balcony of our condo today to make a racket at midnight.

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                           Conch shell, showing the hole for blowing.

To view other posts about the festive Season in Toronto throughout the years.

New Year’s Eve in Toronto in 1945

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/28/new-years-eve-in-toronto-1945/

Toronto’s iconic buildings amid December’s snow in 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/27/torontos-streets-and-iconic-buildings-set-in-snow-dec-2012/

Toronto’s Eaton Centre decorations at night

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/22/torontos-eaton-centre-xmas-decorations-at-night-in-2012/

Butter sculptures in the lobby of Toronto’s Royal York Hotel

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/19/xmas-butter-sculptures-in-royal-york-hotel-lobby/

A popcorn man on the street in downtown Toronto during Christmas

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/18/a-popcorn-man-in-toronto-during-christmas-2012/

Photos with the Eaton’s Santa in 1941 and 1943

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/18/photos-with-eatons-santa-claus-in-1941-and-1944/

A church Christmas pageant in Toronto in 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/church-xmas-concerts-of-yesteryear-remain-alive-in-toronto/

Downtown Toronto’s lights and Christmas displays – 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/downtown-torontos-xmas-displays-at-night/

The Christmas windows at the Bay Store are magical at night

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/16/the-bay-xmas-windows-on-queen-become-magical-at-night/

Christmas at the historic St. Lawrence Market in 1921 and in 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/14/xmas-at-the-historic-st-lawrence-market-in-1921-and-in-2012/

The Christmas windows at the Bay Store on Queen Street, 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/the-2012-christmas-windows-at-the-bay-store-on-queen-street/

The amazing gingerbread houses on the underground Pathway in Toronto

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/amazing-christmas-gingerbread-houses-on-torontos-pathway/

The gigantic metallic reindeer in the Eaton Centre

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/13/the-gigantic-xmas-reindeer-in-the-eaton-centre/

Christmas cards mailed in Toronto during the years 1924-1926

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/11/xmas-cards-mailed-in-toronto-1924-1927/

The Christmas buffet lunch at the Arcadian Court at the Simpson’s Queen Street Store in Toronto (the Bay)

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/30/christmas-lunch-at-simpsons-arcadian-court-in-the-1950s-featured-in-murdermystery/

Christmas at Mackenzie House on Bond Street.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/07/torontos-mackenzie-house-on-bond-street-at-christmas/

Christmas at Toronto’s St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/09/christmas-at-the-st-lawrence-market-in-torontos-yesteryear/

The Christmas Market at the Distillery District

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/10/my-recent-visit-to-torontos-christmas-market-at-the-distillery-district/

Memories of the Christmas windows of the Simpson’s store on Queen Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/03/memories-of-the-christmas-windows-of-the-simpsons-store-at-queen-and-bay-streets/

Christmas at the Kensington Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/01/enjoying-the-kensington-market-at-christmas/

Memories of Toyland on the fifth floor of the old Eaton’s Store at Queen and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/29/memories-of-eatons-toyland-in-the-1940s/

The Christmas lights on Yonge Street in the 1950s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/24/memories-of-the-lights-at-xmas-on-torontos-yonge-street-in-the-1950s/

The history of Toronto’s Santa Claus Parade

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/history-of-torontos-santa-claus-parade/

The 1940s Christmas radio broadcasts featuring Santa Claus

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/memories-of-trimming-the-tree-and-the-eatons-christmas-radio-broadcasts-in-1944/

Christmas at Toronto’s historic St. Andrew’s Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/23/christmas-during-the-19th-century-at-torontos-historic-st-andrews-market/

Christmas trees and seasonal decorations in Toronto

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/20/favourite-christmas-trees-and-decorations-in-toronto-this-year/

Celebrating the 12 days of Christmas in old Newfoundland

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/celebrating-the-12-days-of-christmas-in-the-newfoundland-of-yesteryear/

A humorous account of a Christmas concert in old Newfoundland

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/a-humorous-account-of-a-church-xmas-concert-in-old-newfoundland/

Link to the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted by on December 29, 2012 in Toronto

 

New Year’s Eve in Toronto-1945

In our house on Lauder Avenue, on New Year’s Eve in 1945, as my family awaited the midnight hour, my brother and I played the board games that we had received for Christmas. “Elsie the Cow” and “Snakes and Ladders” were our favourites. The adults were quietly chatting, remembering the days when they were young, and lamenting how swiftly the years had passed. Later in life, I was to learn that these two topics were the perennial favourites of older people. Eventually I was to adopt these same topics as my own, particularly on New Year’s Eve when the passage of time was most readily evident.

On this Eve of Eves in 1945, in the background, the radio was playing, “Sentimental Journey”—Gonna take a sentimental journey, gonna set my heart at ease. It had been one of the year’s biggest hits, along with the wartime song “Bell Bottom Trousers.”  Shortly after the hour of ten, my mother told us to climb the stairs to bed. She said that we were too young to stay up until midnight. Reluctantly, we complied.

In our bedroom upstairs, around eleven o’clock, because sleep eluded us, my brother and I peered out the bedroom window. The street was empty, the severity of the cold having forced everyone to remain indoors. We heard the wind whistling through the empty avenue below, as well as in the narrow driveway between the houses. We thought about the noisy parties that were being held elsewhere, as we had heard our dad talking about the downtown clubs and restaurants, where the revelries would increase in volume as the final hour of the old year ticked away. However, at our house, all remained quiet.

Though my brother and I were fast asleep when the midnight hour arrived, we knew what would occur. Unlike the downtown scene or even the local beverage room, the Oakwood Hotel, my parents would indulge in only a small sip of the “sinful juice.” My mother did not consider port or sherry alcoholic, even though it actually contained more alcohol than either beer or wine. I suppose she rationalized this by thinking that at least they were not consuming hard liquor. Many maiden aunts throughout the years have engaged in similar reasoning, declaring that they never drank spirits, although they did occasionally enjoy a tipple of sherry. Wise old ladies!

On New Year’s Day, my father read in the newspaper that at the Royal York, a cute young blonde had wandered among the tables holding a bottle of Worcestershire sauce, slurring her words as she inquired, “Anyone want a snort?” An elderly gentleman whispered to a male friend, “I’d appreciate a snort with her any day.” The reporter stated that they had both grinned like schoolboys. The articles also said that when the magic moment arrived, a scantily clad “Miss 1946” arrived in the ballroom. Shouts and cheers exploded as the tensions of the war years receded from memory. The crowds chorused the words “Happy New Year!” with greater sincerity than previous years, when the constant casualty reports from Europe and the Far East had dampened the celebration. The reporter noted that soon after midnight, in the downtown, the most common phrase was, “Is this taxi taken?” The following morning, the most common phrase throughout the city was, “Has anyone seen the Aspirin bottle?”

When my brother and I were considerably older, we discovered why the Aspirin bottle was an integral part of the New Year’s celebration.

The above is based on the book,”Arse over Teakettle,” a novel about growing up in wartime Toronto.

For a link to this book: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/arse-over-teakettle/

To view other posts about the Christmas season in Toronto throughout the years.

Decorations for Xmas in the Eaton Centre at night

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/22/torontos-eaton-centre-xmas-decorations-at-night-in-2012/

A popcorn man on the street in downtown Toronto during Christmas

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/18/a-popcorn-man-in-toronto-during-christmas-2012/

Photos with the Eaton’s Santa in 1941 and 1943

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/18/photos-with-eatons-santa-claus-in-1941-and-1944/

A church Christmas pageant in Toronto in 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/church-xmas-concerts-of-yesteryear-remain-alive-in-toronto/

Downtown Toronto’s lights and Christmas displays – 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/downtown-torontos-xmas-displays-at-night/

The Christmas windows at the Bay Store are magical at night

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/16/the-bay-xmas-windows-on-queen-become-magical-at-night/

Christmas at the historic St. Lawrence Market in 1921 and in 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/14/xmas-at-the-historic-st-lawrence-market-in-1921-and-in-2012/

The Christmas windows at the Bay Store on Queen Street, 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/the-2012-christmas-windows-at-the-bay-store-on-queen-street/

The amazing gingerbread houses on the underground Pathway in Toronto

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/amazing-christmas-gingerbread-houses-on-torontos-pathway/

The gigantic metallic reindeer in the Eaton Centre

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/13/the-gigantic-xmas-reindeer-in-the-eaton-centre/

Christmas cards mailed in Toronto during the years 1924-1926

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/11/xmas-cards-mailed-in-toronto-1924-1927/

The Christmas buffet lunch at the Arcadian Court at the Simpson’s Queen Street Store in Toronto (the Bay)

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/30/christmas-lunch-at-simpsons-arcadian-court-in-the-1950s-featured-in-murdermystery/

Christmas at Mackenzie House on Bond Street.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/07/torontos-mackenzie-house-on-bond-street-at-christmas/

Christmas at Toronto’s St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/09/christmas-at-the-st-lawrence-market-in-torontos-yesteryear/

The Christmas Market at the Distillery District

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/10/my-recent-visit-to-torontos-christmas-market-at-the-distillery-district/

Memories of the Christmas windows of the Simpson’s store on Queen Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/03/memories-of-the-christmas-windows-of-the-simpsons-store-at-queen-and-bay-streets/

Christmas at the Kensington Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/01/enjoying-the-kensington-market-at-christmas/

Memories of Toyland on the fifth floor of the old Eaton’s Store at Queen and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/29/memories-of-eatons-toyland-in-the-1940s/

The Christmas lights on Yonge Street in the 1950s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/24/memories-of-the-lights-at-xmas-on-torontos-yonge-street-in-the-1950s/

The history of Toronto’s Santa Claus Parade

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/history-of-torontos-santa-claus-parade/

The 1940s Christmas radio broadcasts featuring Santa Claus

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/memories-of-trimming-the-tree-and-the-eatons-christmas-radio-broadcasts-in-1944/

Christmas at Toronto’s historic St. Andrew’s Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/23/christmas-during-the-19th-century-at-torontos-historic-st-andrews-market/

Christmas trees and seasonal decorations in Toronto

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/20/favourite-christmas-trees-and-decorations-in-toronto-this-year/

Celebrating the 12 days of Christmas in old Newfoundland

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/celebrating-the-12-days-of-christmas-in-the-newfoundland-of-yesteryear/

A humorous account of a Christmas concert in old Newfoundland

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/a-humorous-account-of-a-church-xmas-concert-in-old-newfoundland/

Link to the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
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Posted by on December 28, 2012 in Toronto

 

Toronto’s streets and iconic buildings set in snow-Dec. 2012

We did not have a white Christmas, but the city awakened on the first day after the holidays to a winter wonderland, much to the chagrin of those forced to drive to work on the slushy streets. I took advantage of the occasion to walk the downtown streets and photograph the iconic buildings. Despite the lack of blue skies, the city looked “great.” 

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Brant Street, looking south toward King Street, St. Andrew’s Park on the right-hand side of the photo.

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                   Queen St. West looking west toward Bathurst.

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                Spadina Avenue looking south toward King Street.

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        Backpackers’ Hotel on the northwest corner of King and Spadina

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                                Old City Hall at Queen and Bay Streets.

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                                     Roy Thomson Hall and Metro Hall 

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                                              Corner of King and Spadina

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The 1883 former drug store on the southwest corner of King and John Streets

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The old Methodist Publishing House, now Bell Media, at John and Queen Streets

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                                Queen Street West and McCaul Street

To view other posts about Toronto’s past and its historic buildings:

The 1902 bank on the northeast corner of Spadina and Queen Street is an architectural gem.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/torontos-architectural-gemsbank-at-spadina-and-queen-west/

Military hero of the War of 1812 lived near corner of Spadina and Queen West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/01/military-hero-of-war-of-1812-lived-near-mcdonalds-at-queen-and-spadina/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The old Dominion Bank Building at King and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/the-old-dominion-bank-buildingnow-a-condo-hotel-at-one-king-st-west/

The Canada Life Building on University and Queen Street West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/exploring-torontos-architectural-gemsthe-canada-life-building/

Campbell House at the corner of Queen Street West and University Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/18/a-glimpse-at-the-interior-of-campbell-house-at-university-avenue-and-queen-street/

A study of Osgoode Hall

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-osgoode-hall/

Toronto’s first City Hall, now a part of the St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/torontos-first-city-hall-now-a-part-of-the-st-lawrence-market/

The St. Lawrence Hall on King Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-st-lawrence-hall/

Toronto’s streetcars through the past decades

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/26/memories-of-torontos-streetcars-of-yesteryear/

History of Trinity Bellwoods Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/the-history-and-beauty-of-trinity-bellwood-park/

A history of Toronto’s famous ferry boats to the Toronto Islands

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/remember-the-toronto-island-ferries-the-bluebell-primroseand-trillium/

Toronto’s Old City Hall at Bay and Queen Streets

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/22/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-old-city-hall/

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
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Posted by on December 27, 2012 in Toronto

 

Favourite newspaper cartoons of Rob Ford 2012

With Christmas of 2012 now tucked into memory, it is a good time to look back over the previous twelve months and recall our favourite moments. Below are the two political cartoons from the Toronto newspapers that I enjoyed the most.

Globe 2012

                                          This was was from the Globe.

Star 2012

                    This was my favourite from the Toronto Star

To view other posts about Rob Ford:

Rob Ford continues to inspire the Toronto art scene

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/10/rob-ford-continues-to-inspire-torontos-art-scene/

Rob Ford in butter rather than the proverbial hot water

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/23/rob-ford-in-butter-rather-than-the-proverbial-hot-water/

Graffiti in Toronto depicting Rob Ford is highly disturbing

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/31/graffiti-about-rob-ford-is-highly-disturbing/

To view the Home page for this blog:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view posts about Toronto’s past and its historic buildings:

Military hero of the War of 1812 lived near corner of Spadina and Queen West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/01/military-hero-of-war-of-1812-lived-near-mcdonalds-at-queen-and-spadina/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The old Dominion Bank Building at King and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/the-old-dominion-bank-buildingnow-a-condo-hotel-at-one-king-st-west/

The Canada Life Building on University and Queen Street West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/exploring-torontos-architectural-gemsthe-canada-life-building/

Campbell House at the corner of Queen Street West and University Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/18/a-glimpse-at-the-interior-of-campbell-house-at-university-avenue-and-queen-street/

A study of Osgoode Hall

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-osgoode-hall/

Toronto’s first City Hall, now a part of the St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/torontos-first-city-hall-now-a-part-of-the-st-lawrence-market/

The St. Lawrence Hall on King Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-st-lawrence-hall/

Toronto’s streetcars through the past decades

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/26/memories-of-torontos-streetcars-of-yesteryear/

History of Trinity Bellwoods Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/the-history-and-beauty-of-trinity-bellwood-park/

A history of Toronto’s famous ferry boats to the Toronto Islands

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/remember-the-toronto-island-ferries-the-bluebell-primroseand-trillium/

Toronto’s Old City Hall at Bay and Queen Streets

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/22/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-old-city-hall/

 
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Posted by on December 26, 2012 in Toronto

 

Toronto’s Eaton Centre Xmas decorations at night in 2012

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The Christmas decorations at the Eaton Centre become truly magical at night, when the skylights in the Galleria cease to reflect the light from outdoors, closing the mall against the outside world. I saw parents taking wide-eyed children by the hand, walking under the magnificent sculptures, and pointing up at the reindeers’ bellies. Others were standing still to stare at the colourful displays, too overcome to speak. I believe that the adults were enjoying the experience as much as the children. In future years, the children will treasure the memories of their visits to downtown Toronto in 2012, at Christmas, as much as those of us who are older cherish our memories of similar events – Santa at Eaton’s and Simpson’s, Toyland, The Eaton’s Santa Claus Parade, the Simpson’s windows, lights at City Hall, and the strings of lights on Yonge Street. Christmas is a time to create memories and recall pleasant times of the yuletide season from our past.

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To view other posts about Christmas in Toronto throughout the years.

A popcorn man on the street in downtown Toronto during Christmas

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/18/a-popcorn-man-in-toronto-during-christmas-2012/

Photos with the Eaton’s Santa in 1941 and 1943

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/18/photos-with-eatons-santa-claus-in-1941-and-1944/

A church Christmas pageant in Toronto in 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/church-xmas-concerts-of-yesteryear-remain-alive-in-toronto/

Downtown Toronto’s lights and Christmas displays – 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/downtown-torontos-xmas-displays-at-night/

The Christmas windows at the Bay Store are magical at night

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/16/the-bay-xmas-windows-on-queen-become-magical-at-night/

Christmas at the historic St. Lawrence Market in 1921 and in 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/14/xmas-at-the-historic-st-lawrence-market-in-1921-and-in-2012/

The Christmas windows at the Bay Store on Queen Street, 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/the-2012-christmas-windows-at-the-bay-store-on-queen-street/

The amazing gingerbread houses on the underground Pathway in Toronto

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/amazing-christmas-gingerbread-houses-on-torontos-pathway/

The gigantic metallic reindeer in the Eaton Centre

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/13/the-gigantic-xmas-reindeer-in-the-eaton-centre/

Christmas cards mailed in Toronto during the years 1924-1926

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/11/xmas-cards-mailed-in-toronto-1924-1927/

The Christmas buffet lunch at the Arcadian Court at the Simpson’s Queen Street Store in Toronto (the Bay)

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/30/christmas-lunch-at-simpsons-arcadian-court-in-the-1950s-featured-in-murdermystery/

Christmas at Mackenzie House on Bond Street.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/07/torontos-mackenzie-house-on-bond-street-at-christmas/

Christmas at Toronto’s St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/09/christmas-at-the-st-lawrence-market-in-torontos-yesteryear/

The Christmas Market at the Distillery District

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/10/my-recent-visit-to-torontos-christmas-market-at-the-distillery-district/

Memories of the Christmas windows of the Simpson’s store on Queen Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/03/memories-of-the-christmas-windows-of-the-simpsons-store-at-queen-and-bay-streets/

Christmas at the Kensington Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/01/enjoying-the-kensington-market-at-christmas/

Memories of Toyland on the fifth floor of the old Eaton’s Store at Queen and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/29/memories-of-eatons-toyland-in-the-1940s/

The Christmas lights on Yonge Street in the 1950s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/24/memories-of-the-lights-at-xmas-on-torontos-yonge-street-in-the-1950s/

The history of Toronto’s Santa Claus Parade

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/history-of-torontos-santa-claus-parade/

The 1940s Christmas radio broadcasts featuring Santa Claus

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/memories-of-trimming-the-tree-and-the-eatons-christmas-radio-broadcasts-in-1944/

Christmas at Toronto’s historic St. Andrew’s Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/23/christmas-during-the-19th-century-at-torontos-historic-st-andrews-market/

Christmas trees and seasonal decorations in Toronto

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/20/favourite-christmas-trees-and-decorations-in-toronto-this-year/

Celebrating the 12 days of Christmas in old Newfoundland

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/celebrating-the-12-days-of-christmas-in-the-newfoundland-of-yesteryear/

A humorous account of a Christmas concert in old Newfoundland

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/a-humorous-account-of-a-church-xmas-concert-in-old-newfoundland/

Link to the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 22, 2012 in Toronto

 

Toronto’s weather has gone to Vancouver for Xmas of 2012

This December, the weather in Toronto has been so mild that it is difficult to believe that we are into the yuletide season. However, Vancouver has been hit with so much snow that the city has had difficulties coping with the traffic snarls.  In the past, Toronto has also endured some very heavy snowstorms.

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Can you believe that this is Toronto? The above picture was taken in December of 1944, when the worst snowstorm to ever hit the city descended. The picture is of Bay Street, looking north to the Old City Hall on Queen Street. The men in the intersection are clearing the streets.

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This is the intersection at Bay and College Streets. The building on the southeast corner is the Eaton’s College street Store, which has since been demolished. A Peter Witt streetcar can be seen travelling north on Bay Street. This photo, from the City of Toronto Archives, was also taken in December of 1944.

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The above picture is Yonge street in December of 1944, looking north from near Richmond Street. The building seen behind the PCC streetcar is the Bay Store at Queen and Yonge Street.

The snowstorm of 1944 was the worst snowstorm in Toronto’s history. It was rare that stories linking Canada and snow were considered newsworthy. In other countries, they usually ranked them in the same category as an old bachelor’s love life—frigid, but who cares? However, this was an exception, as the event created newspaper headlines across North America.

A warm, moist air mass travelled for several days northward up the Mississippi Valley from the Gulf of Mexico. Its effects were first felt in Colorado; it continued northward, gradually spinning to the northeast. It reached northern New York State in the early evening of Monday, 11 December, sweeping westward below the Niagara Escarpment and across Lake Ontario. Then, changing direction, it approached Toronto from the east. Before it blew out to sea off the Atlantic seaboard, it created a wide swath of death and destruction.

Even today, lake-effect storms remain the city’s worst winter nightmare. The famous “storm of ’44” began on a Monday evening, when snow flurries scattered across the streets and laneways. Soon, its intensity increased. As midnight approached, the storm intensified. In the early hours of the morning of 12 December, Torontonians awoke to a wintry world beyond imagination. By 8:00 a.m., nineteen inches (nearly fifty centimetres) had fallen. The storm continued, and by 10:00 a.m., there were twenty inches, twenty-one by noontime. Before the storm abated in the afternoon, twenty-two and a half inches of snow had accumulated.

Because of the gale-force winds, drifts were six to ten feet high. The previous record snowfall was in 1876, with 16.2 inches (41.1 cm). During the snow crisis of 1999, when Mayor Mel Lastman called in the army, 15.5 inches (39.3 cm) fell. The 1944 storm still holds the record as the greatest amount of snow from a single storm.

When people awoke and gazed out their frost-covered windows, it appeared as if an enormous snow-filled dumpster had dropped its contents, burying the city. Streets and laneways were impassable, sidewalks were blocked with drifts, fences were buried, and most garden sheds had vanished beneath a thick layer of white. Other than the wind, the only sounds were the muffled clip-clops of a few horse carts whose owners foolishly braved the drifts.

One newspaper reporter wrote, “It’s as if a giant’s hand has silenced the city.”

On the radio, Mayor Conboy issues a request to the people of Toronto: “Remain within your homes, and do not travel to work unless necessary. Any available public transportation has been reserved for emergencies and those employed in the war industries, as their production is essential for victory. Cars are banned from roadways with streetcar lines. Get into the national spirit and help our city support the war effort.”

Despite these restrictions, it was hopeless. The city moved in slow motion. Hospitals were short staffed; they postponed surgeries. On the radio, Bell Telephone notified customers that no repair trucks were available and asked them to limit their phone calls. Funerals were cancelled. Milk and bread deliveries were impossible. Courts of justice were shut down when jurors failed to arrive. The Toronto Stock Exchange ceased operations.

At 11:30 a.m., Premier Drew adjourned the legislative session at Queen’s Park. It was announced, “All activity has ceased.”

On this subject, one newscaster commented, “What’s different? There’s rarely any activity even when the government is in session.”

Eaton’s and Simpson’s closed but vowed to open the following day. However, Eaton’s declared that if any customers arrived at their doors during the storm, they would escort them through the departments.

The University of Toronto suspended all classes for the day, as the campus was buried beneath six-foot drifts. Its ornate Gothic buildings resembled a deserted movie set—eerie, empty, and ghostly. Icy winds whistled through the doorways of the old buildings, bombarding the massive stone walls of University College, Convocation Hall, and Hart House. They wrapped around Memorial Tower, piling the snow under the massive archway. Tornado-like winds hammered the near-vacant quadrangle at the heart of the campus, where a few hearty students struggled through the snowbanks only to be confronted by empty lecture halls.

Officials closed public schools, though many parents were unaware of the announcement and sent their children to school, anyway. One principal reported that of the 530 pupils that normally attended the school, only 60 had arrived. Toronto’s one hundred thousand elementary school children and three thousand teachers had a winter holiday. High schools were in the middle of term examinations and had been scheduled to close on Friday for the Christmas break. Because of the storm, they decided to postpone the exams until the following Monday, the students relinquishing a day of their regular ten-day holidays.

It was indeed a snowstorm to remember.

The above information is from the book, “Arse Over Teakettle.” For a link to this book :https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/arse-over-teakettle/

To view other posts about Christmas in Toronto throughout the years.

The Christmas butter sculptures in the lobby of the Royal York Hotel

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/19/xmas-butter-sculptures-in-royal-york-hotel-lobby/

A popcorn man on the street in downtown Toronto during Christmas

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/18/a-popcorn-man-in-toronto-during-christmas-2012/

Photos with the Eaton’s Santa in 1941 and 1943

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/18/photos-with-eatons-santa-claus-in-1941-and-1944/

A church Christmas pageant in Toronto in 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/church-xmas-concerts-of-yesteryear-remain-alive-in-toronto/

Downtown Toronto’s lights and Christmas displays – 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/downtown-torontos-xmas-displays-at-night/

The Christmas windows at the Bay Store are magical at night

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/16/the-bay-xmas-windows-on-queen-become-magical-at-night/

Christmas at the historic St. Lawrence Market in 1921 and in 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/14/xmas-at-the-historic-st-lawrence-market-in-1921-and-in-2012/

The Christmas windows at the Bay Store on Queen Street, 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/the-2012-christmas-windows-at-the-bay-store-on-queen-street/

The amazing gingerbread houses on the underground Pathway in Toronto

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/amazing-christmas-gingerbread-houses-on-torontos-pathway/

The gigantic metallic reindeer in the Eaton Centre

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/13/the-gigantic-xmas-reindeer-in-the-eaton-centre/

Christmas cards mailed in Toronto during the years 1924-1926

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/11/xmas-cards-mailed-in-toronto-1924-1927/

The Christmas buffet lunch at the Arcadian Court at the Simpson’s Queen Street Store in Toronto (the Bay)

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/30/christmas-lunch-at-simpsons-arcadian-court-in-the-1950s-featured-in-murdermystery/

Christmas at Mackenzie House on Bond Street.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/07/torontos-mackenzie-house-on-bond-street-at-christmas/

Christmas at Toronto’s St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/09/christmas-at-the-st-lawrence-market-in-torontos-yesteryear/

The Christmas Market at the Distillery District

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/10/my-recent-visit-to-torontos-christmas-market-at-the-distillery-district/

Memories of the Christmas windows of the Simpson’s store on Queen Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/03/memories-of-the-christmas-windows-of-the-simpsons-store-at-queen-and-bay-streets/

Christmas at the Kensington Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/01/enjoying-the-kensington-market-at-christmas/

Memories of Toyland on the fifth floor of the old Eaton’s Store at Queen and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/29/memories-of-eatons-toyland-in-the-1940s/

The Christmas lights on Yonge Street in the 1950s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/24/memories-of-the-lights-at-xmas-on-torontos-yonge-street-in-the-1950s/

The history of Toronto’s Santa Claus Parade

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/history-of-torontos-santa-claus-parade/

The 1940s Christmas radio broadcasts featuring Santa Claus

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/memories-of-trimming-the-tree-and-the-eatons-christmas-radio-broadcasts-in-1944/

Christmas at Toronto’s historic St. Andrew’s Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/23/christmas-during-the-19th-century-at-torontos-historic-st-andrews-market/

Christmas trees and seasonal decorations in Toronto

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/20/favourite-christmas-trees-and-decorations-in-toronto-this-year/

Celebrating the 12 days of Christmas in old Newfoundland

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/celebrating-the-12-days-of-christmas-in-the-newfoundland-of-yesteryear/

A humorous account of a Christmas concert in old Newfoundland

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/a-humorous-account-of-a-church-xmas-concert-in-old-newfoundland/

Link to the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 

 
1 Comment

Posted by on December 20, 2012 in Toronto

 

Xmas butter sculptures in Toronto’s Royal York Hotel lobby

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The Royal York Hotel decorates its lobby each December to welcome visitors over the yuletide season. Although the hotel lobby is one of the largest in the city, the space appears intimate and warm. Butter sculptures in numerous glass showcases depict the traditions and stories of Christmas. The colourful Christmas tree at the west end of the lobby is the focal point of the seasonal display.

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                                                    The lobby of the hotel

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                 The Christmas tree at the west side of the lobby

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Carved in butter is jolly old St. Nick with his bag of toys and his sleigh

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                         A group of carollers carved in butter

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                                      The Grinch who stole Christmas

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                                    Miss Piggy and Kermit sing a carol

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                                     The Royal York Hotel lobby

To view other posts about Christmas in Toronto throughout the years.

A popcorn man on the street in downtown Toronto during Christmas

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/18/a-popcorn-man-in-toronto-during-christmas-2012/

Photos with the Eaton’s Santa in 1941 and 1943

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/18/photos-with-eatons-santa-claus-in-1941-and-1944/

A church Christmas pageant in Toronto in 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/church-xmas-concerts-of-yesteryear-remain-alive-in-toronto/

Downtown Toronto’s lights and Christmas displays – 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/downtown-torontos-xmas-displays-at-night/

The Christmas windows at the Bay Store are magical at night

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/16/the-bay-xmas-windows-on-queen-become-magical-at-night/

Christmas at the historic St. Lawrence Market in 1921 and in 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/14/xmas-at-the-historic-st-lawrence-market-in-1921-and-in-2012/

The Christmas windows at the Bay Store on Queen Street, 2012

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/the-2012-christmas-windows-at-the-bay-store-on-queen-street/

The amazing gingerbread houses on the underground Pathway in Toronto

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/amazing-christmas-gingerbread-houses-on-torontos-pathway/

The gigantic metallic reindeer in the Eaton Centre

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/13/the-gigantic-xmas-reindeer-in-the-eaton-centre/

Christmas cards mailed in Toronto during the years 1924-1926

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/11/xmas-cards-mailed-in-toronto-1924-1927/

The Christmas buffet lunch at the Arcadian Court at the Simpson’s Queen Street Store in Toronto (the Bay)

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/30/christmas-lunch-at-simpsons-arcadian-court-in-the-1950s-featured-in-murdermystery/

Christmas at Mackenzie House on Bond Street.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/07/torontos-mackenzie-house-on-bond-street-at-christmas/

Christmas at Toronto’s St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/09/christmas-at-the-st-lawrence-market-in-torontos-yesteryear/

The Christmas Market at the Distillery District

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/10/my-recent-visit-to-torontos-christmas-market-at-the-distillery-district/

Memories of the Christmas windows of the Simpson’s store on Queen Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/03/memories-of-the-christmas-windows-of-the-simpsons-store-at-queen-and-bay-streets/

Christmas at the Kensington Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/01/enjoying-the-kensington-market-at-christmas/

Memories of Toyland on the fifth floor of the old Eaton’s Store at Queen and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/29/memories-of-eatons-toyland-in-the-1940s/

The Christmas lights on Yonge Street in the 1950s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/24/memories-of-the-lights-at-xmas-on-torontos-yonge-street-in-the-1950s/

The history of Toronto’s Santa Claus Parade

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/history-of-torontos-santa-claus-parade/

The 1940s Christmas radio broadcasts featuring Santa Claus

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/memories-of-trimming-the-tree-and-the-eatons-christmas-radio-broadcasts-in-1944/

Christmas at Toronto’s historic St. Andrew’s Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/23/christmas-during-the-19th-century-at-torontos-historic-st-andrews-market/

Christmas trees and seasonal decorations in Toronto

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/12/20/favourite-christmas-trees-and-decorations-in-toronto-this-year/

Celebrating the 12 days of Christmas in old Newfoundland

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/celebrating-the-12-days-of-christmas-in-the-newfoundland-of-yesteryear/

A humorous account of a Christmas concert in old Newfoundland

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/17/a-humorous-account-of-a-church-xmas-concert-in-old-newfoundland/

Link to the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

 
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Posted by on December 19, 2012 in Toronto