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Monthly Archives: May 2013

Toronto’s lost treasures—the Vaughan Theatre on St. Clair Ave.

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The Vaughan Theatre on St. Clair Avenue, near Vaughan Road. The picture was taken in 1950 when the film “Francis the Talking Mule” with Tony Curtis, Piper Laurie and Donald O’Connor was playing. The automobile in the foreground is a 1949-torpedo-back Chevrolet. The photo is from the collection of John Chuckman.

The Vaughan Theatre disappeared from the Toronto scene many decades ago, but it remains vivid in my memory as it was one of the first theatres that my parents allowed me to attend that was not within walking distance of our house. I especially recall that on hot summer days, when the streets of Toronto sizzled with heat, my friends and I boarded a Vaughan Bus at Oakwood Avenue and Vaughan Road to travel to the theatre. Because the Vaughan Theatre was only three years old in 1950, the air-conditioning system was new. It was “goose-bump” cold. I also remember seeing the film “Francis the Talking Mule” at the Vaughan. As we were pre-teens at that time, my friends and I thought it immensely funny. I remember the line in the movie when Francis the Mule said that he received his information from the FBI—”Feed Bag Information.” 

The doors of the Vaughan Theatre facing St. Clair Avenue were large sheets of glass, with no metal frames around them. We considered this to be ultra-modern. The appeal of the theatre continued in the lobby area, where a sleek candy bar of metal and glass wrapped round the north side of the lobby. On either side of the candy bar were sloped ramps that led up to the auditorium. The seats were extra plush and the stage curtains were rich in appearance and velvety. I believe that they were royal red. When they majestically parted to allow the featured films to begin, it was as if a window on the world had opened. I remember viewing the film, “Son of Ali Baba,” starring a very young Tony Cutis and the beautiful Piper Laurie at the Vaughan in  1952. In the movie, when the magic carpet flew over the city of Bagdad, I felt as if I were floating away to realms beyond my wildest dreams. The magic of the movies never departed from my heart.

The Vaughan was built in 1947, two years after the Second World War. During the war years, because the news from the battlefront in Europe had been depressing, with casualties reported daily, the movies allowed an avenue of escape for Torontonians. Following the war, movies remained highly popular and new theatres continued to be opened throughout the city. The Vaughan was one of these, and for “B and F” Theatres, it was considered one of their finest venues. It seated 1000 move-goers, which was more than the companies’ other two large theatres—the Donlands in East York and the Century on the Danforth. Because theatres competed for audiences, they offered special promotions to attract people on Monday and Tuesday evenings, when audiences were more sparse. Free chinaware and autographed pictures of movie stars were among the items offered.

The architectural firm that designed the Vaughan was  Kaplan and Sprachman. Harold Solomon Kaplan (1895-1973) and Mandel Sprachman created the designs for many of the city’s finest theatres—the Casino, Eglinton, Downtown, Bellevue, Colony, and the Town Cinema. Those who remember Toronto’s golden age of movie houses, will recognize these names.

The Earlscourt History Club, on a post published in November of 2009, stated that there is a story about a man who hanged himself in the Vaughan Theatre, on its opening night. Lore has it that the building became haunted. As a pre-teen, I never heard this rumour, but if I had, it would have added to the appeal of this grand theatre. Unfortunately, the only goose-bumps I experienced in the theatre were from the air-conditioning, rather than from a ghost. 

The Vaughan Theatre was demolished in the 1980s, and several commercial buildings now occupy the site.

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The 1950s photo looks east along St. Clair Avenue towards Vaughan Road. The Vaughan Theatre is on the north side of the street. In the photo, on the right-hand side, there is a partial view of the east corner of a F. W. Woolworth Store. The chain of department stores became Woolco in 1962. Photo is from the collection of John Chuckman.

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            Interior of the Vaughan (Photo, City of Toronto Archives)

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                Interior of the Vaughan (City of Toronto Archives)

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The magnificent marquee of the Vaughan in 1948 (Photo City of Toronto Archives)

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This photo is also about 1948, as the film “Framed” with Glenn Ford was released in 1947. Photo from City of Toronto Archives

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view previous blogs about other movie houses of Toronto—old and new

Toronto’s first movie screening and its first movie theatre

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/03/13/torontos-first-movie-screening-and-first-movie-theatre/

The ultra-modern Scotiabank Theatre at Richmond and John Streets

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/04/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-modern-scotiabank-theatre/

Cineplex Theatre at Yonge and Dundas Streets

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/11/torontos-architectural-gems-cineplex-at-dundas-and-yonge-streets/

The Ed Mirvish Theatre (the Pantages, Imperial and Cannon)

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/02/27/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-ed-mirvish-theatre-pantages-imperial-canon/

The Downtown Theatre (now demolished) at Yonge and Dundas

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/02/26/torontos-lost-movie-theatresthe-downtown-theatre-on-yonge-st-south-of-dundas/

The Orpheum Theatre on Queen St., west of Bathurst

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/02/07/torontos-old-movie-theatres-the-orpheum-on-queen-st-w/

The Bellevue Theatre on College Street that became the Lux Burlesque Theatre

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/14/the-bellevue-theatre-lux-burlesque-theatre-on-college-street/

Old movie houses of Toronto

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/06/27/old-movie-houses-of-toronto/

The Odeon Carlton theatre on Carlton St., east of Yonge St.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/07/02/colour-photo-of-the-odeon-carlton-in-1956-a-marilyn-monroe-film-playing/

2011/07/02/colour-photo-of-the-odeon-carlton-in-1956-a-marilyn-monroe-film-playing/https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

The Victory burlesque and movie theatre on Spadina at Dundas:

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/08/the-sinful-victory-burlesque-theatre-at-dundas-and-spadina/

The Shea’s Hippodrome Theatre on Bay St. near Queen

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/07/04/sheas-hippodrome-theatre-where-the-nathan-phillips-square-exists-today/

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/09/07/photographs-from-the-1950s-of-sheas-hippodrome-theatre-located-on-the-site-of-torontos-new-city-hall/

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/06/old-movie-houses-of-toronto-fond-memories-of-sheas-hippodrome/

Attending a matinee in the old movie houses of Toronto during the “golden age of cinema”

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/attending-a-movie-matinee-in-toronto-during-the-golden-age-of-cinema/

The University Theatre on Bloor St., west of Bay Street.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/the-opening-of-torontos-university-theatre-on-bloor-street/

Archival photos of the Imperial and Downtown Theatres on Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/04/archival-photos-of-torontos-old-theatres-give-reality-to-historical-novel/

The Elgin/Winter/Garden Theatres on Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/05/31/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-elgin-winter-garden-theatres/

The now vanished Avon Theatre at 1092 Queen Street West

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/10/torontos-lost-movie-theatresthe-avon-at-1092-queen-west/

 
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Posted by on May 15, 2013 in Toronto

 

Toronto’s architectural gems—historic St. Andrew’s on King St.

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St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church at 189 King Street West, on the southeast corner of King and Simcoe, is today nestled among the high-rise towers of Toronto’s busy downtown core. When it was built, the city was expanding westward and the area around the church was a fashionable residential district, although there remained a few open fields along some sections of the street. The official residence of the lieutenant governor, the vice-regal representative of Queen Victoria, resided in a magnificent mansion across the street from St. Andrew’s, on the southwest corner of the intersection of King and Simcoe Streets. On the northwest corner were the grounds of the prestigious Upper Canada College.

The congregation of St. Andrew’s had been created in 1830, and they  built the first church on  the southwest corner of Church and Adelaide Streets. When this building became too small for the size of the congregation, they sought a site for a larger building. They chose William George Storm as the architect, who had been born in England, but immigrated to Canada the same year that the parish of St. Andrew’s was created. In 1867, Storm had designed the wrought iron fence that today surrounds Osgoode Hall at Queen Street and University Avenue. As well, he was the architect of Victoria College on the campus of the University of Toronto. 

The congregation of St. Andrew’s purchased land on King Street and construction of the new church commenced in 1874. Storm chose the Romanesque Revival style, and designed three large solid towers on the structure, the largest of them facing Simcoe Street. It overlooked Government House, the residence of the Lieutenant Governor of the Province.  This tower contained small decorative turrets on each of its four corners, as well as large parapets between the mini-towers. The north facade, facing King Street, possessed two towers, with heavy stone ornamentation at the top of each. The church was solid and formal, designed to resemble those built in Mediaeval Scotland. The expansive walls were constructed of Georgetown sandstone, as solid as any ancient castle found in the Scotland of old. It required two years to complete the church, but it was finally dedicated on February 13, 1876. Later, an elaborate chancel was added to the structure. Eric Arthur in his book, “Toronto—No Mean City” stated that St. Andrew’s, as an example of the “picturesque,” had no equal in Toronto.

During the year ahead, St. Andrew’s prospered and grew  into one of the most influential church congregations in Toronto. In the modern era, it has continued to be meaningful by adapting to the problems of being located in an area with some of the most expensive real estate prices in the city. It has raised funds to finance its many programs. The Sun Life Centre, across the street, on the north side of King Street, purchased the “air rights” of the church, which allowed the company to built an office tower on the north side of King Street that was higher than the laws at the time would have allowed. In another deal, the church sold the rights for the space below the church, as well as the air rights surrounding its manse on Simcoe Street. The developer dug under St. Andrew’s, shored up the church structure, and built a 25-storey condominium at the rear of the manse. Today, it towers above the manse, directly across the road from the entrance to the Roy Thomson Hall. 

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The St. Andrew’s Church built in 1830 on the southwest corner of Church and Adelaide Streets (photo from the book “No Mean City” by Eric Arthur). 

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    St. Andrew’s Church in 1907, Toronto Archives, F.1244, It.7033

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North side of the church in March 2013, showing the symmetrical facade facing King Street West. The light from the windows of the Sun Life Centre across the street is reflecting from the stones.

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Top of the tower on the northeast corner of the church. This picture was taken following the restoration work on the tower.

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King Street entrances, with the Romanesque arches above the doorways (March 2013).

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The manse of St. Andrew’s, on Simcoe Street, to the south of the church. The condominium Symphony Place is built around the house. The manse is in the Second Empire style, with a Mansard roof.

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The massive tower on the west side, with its min-turrets and parapet between them.

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This picture from the City of Toronto Archives was taken in the 1970s, prior to the construction of Roy Thomson Hall. The land that was once the site of the residence of the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario became a CPR yard. It was cleared to facilitate the construction of the Roy Thomson Hall. The manse of the church is not yet surrounded by the condo, Symphony Place. 

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        The same site as the previous photo, in the autumn of 2012

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The beautiful interior of the church on a quiet weekday afternoon. The rich wood, handsomely carved, creates a peaceful atmosphere for worship.

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                                                   The chancel of the church

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                          One of the beautiful stained glass windows.

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                                      The immense organ loft

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The east facade facing Emily Street and the north facade of the church on King St. West (March 2013).

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view previous blogs about movie houses of Toronto—historic and modern

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/links-to-toronto-old-movie-housestayloronhistory-com/

Recent publication entitled “Toronto’s Theatres and the Golden Age of the Silver Screen,” by the author of this blog. The publication explores 50 of Toronto’s old theatres and contains over 80 archival photographs of the facades, marquees and interiors of the theatres. It relates anecdotes and stories of the author and others who experienced these grand old movie houses.  

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   To place an order for this book:

https://www.historypress.net/catalogue/bookstore/books/Toronto-Theatres-and-the-Golden-Age-of-the-Silver-Screen/9781626194502 .

Book also available in Chapter/Indigo, the Bell Lightbox Book Store and by phoning University of Toronto Press, Distribution: 416-667-7791

Theatres Included in the Book:

Chapter One – The Early Years—Nickelodeons and the First Theatres in Toronto

Theatorium (Red Mill) Theatre—Toronto’s First Movie Experience and First Permanent Movie Theatre, Auditorium (Avenue, PIckford), Colonial Theatre (the Bay), the Photodrome, Revue Theatre, Picture Palace (Royal George), Big Nickel (National, Rio), Madison Theatre (Midtown, Capri, Eden, Bloor Cinema, Bloor Street Hot Docs), Theatre Without a Name (Pastime, Prince Edward, Fox)

Chapter Two – The Great Movie Palaces – The End of the Nickelodeons

Loew’s Yonge Street (Elgin/Winter Garden), Shea’s Hippodrome, The Allen (Tivoli), Pantages (Imperial, Imperial Six, Ed Mirvish), Loew’s Uptown

Chapter Three – Smaller Theatres in the pre-1920s and 1920s

 Oakwood, Broadway, Carlton on Parliament Street, Victory on Yonge Street (Embassy, Astor, Showcase, Federal, New Yorker, Panasonic), Allan’s Danforth (Century, Titania, Music Hall), Parkdale, Alhambra (Baronet, Eve), St. Clair, Standard (Strand, Victory, Golden Harvest), Palace, Bedford (Park), Hudson (Mount Pleasant), Belsize (Crest, Regent), Runnymede

Chapter Four – Theatres During the 1930s, the Great Depression

Grant ,Hollywood, Oriole (Cinema, International Cinema), Eglinton, Casino, Radio City, Paramount, Scarboro, Paradise (Eve’s Paradise), State (Bloordale), Colony, Bellevue

 

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Toronto’s architectural gems—row houses on Glasgow St.

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Toronto has many architectural gems hidden in secluded locations where many people are unaware of their existence. The houses on Glasgow Street are among them. I first discovered this small street last autumn, while exploring the Spadina-College area of the city. To refer Glasgow Street as a street is perhaps a bit of an exaggeration, as in some respects it resembles a laneway. It can be entered from Cecil Street, which is one block south of College Street, east off Spadina. The entrance is narrow and easily over-looked, as it is beside the east wall of the Cecil Street Community Centre.

The small street that is today Glasgow Street, first appeared in the Toronto Directories in 1889. In that year it was named Spadina Place. In 1906, its name was changed to Glasgow Street, to avoid confusion with Spadina Avenue, as people were writing on envelopes mailed to Spadina Place—“Spadina Avenue Place.”

 Cecil St. Centre, April 2013    April 26, 2013

The photo on the left is of the Cecil Street Community Centre, on the south side of Cecil Street. The right-hand picture is of the sign beside the east wall of the Community Centre that indicates the location of Glasgow Street.

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Similar to other small laneway-streets in the downtown area, Glasgow Street contains row houses built to accommodate workers that immigrated from the British Isles in the latter decades of the 19th century. When the first five houses appeared on the street in 1889, three of them were occupied by labourers, one who earned his living as a painter, and another as a piano maker. These small Second-Empire style houses provided reasonably priced accommodation for immigrant families. Second-Empire houses were very popular in Toronto during the 1870s. Their Mansard roofs, as opposed to peaked roofs, provided more interior space for large families. Unlike the Second-Empire row houses on Draper Street, which were built of brick, the dwellings on Glasgow Street were frame construction.

Today, the row house on Glasgow Street appear charming. Their location, tucked away from the noise and activity of the bustling downtown, is close to the downtown’s cultural and commercial activities. The tranquil atmosphere of this hidden street is a rarity in a city the size of Toronto. Many of the houses have small verandas, likely not present when the houses were first constructed, as the houses were designed to resemble those that the workers had left behind in the villages of Britain. In most instances, their former homes were flush with the stone walkways beside the narrow streets of the towns. At some point in time, small porches were added to some of the verandas to protect the front doors of the homes from the winter winds.

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Another attractive feature of Glasgow Street is that even though it is only one block in length, it possesses its own small park, on the east side of the street. It is an intimate space, well maintained, with benches where residents are able to sit in warm weather to read, chat, or text. The above photo was taken in October of 2012.

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This photo was taken on April 26, 2013, from the entrance to “Glasgow Park.”

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The tranquility of Glasgow Street is not only appreciated by its residents. A contented feline sleeps undisturbed in the spring sunshine of an April morning.

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Houses on Glasgow Street with Mansard roofs and small verandas. On one of them, the remnants of the last summer’s growth remain in the planter box on the railing.

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A house on Glasgow Street with spring flowers in a planter box, and in the background, small porches on the row houses further south along the street .

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Glasgow Street—a tiny part of the 19th century that remains in a city where so much of the past has been obliterated.

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view other posts about Toronto’s unique streets.

Visiting one of Toronto’s best preserved 19th-century streets—Willcocks Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/20/visiting-torontos-best-preserved-nineteenth-century-street-willcocks-street/

Toronto’s Draper Street, a time-tunnel into the 19th century

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/05/23/torontos-draper-street-is-akin-to-a-time-tunnel-into-the-past/

Bulwer Street near Queen and Spadina—a street that has disappeared yet remains in view

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/08/20/a-toronto-street-that-disappeared-but-yet-remains-in-view-bulwer-street/

To view other posts about Toronto’s past and its historic buildings:

The Occidental Building on the southeast corner of Spadina and Queen West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/05/06/torontos-architectural-gems-building-at-queen-and-bathurst/

The historic Cameron House on Queen Street West

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/20/torontos-architectural-gemscameron-house-displays-a-new-mural/

Toronto’s vanishing 19th-century store front.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/torontos-architectural-gems-vanishing-19th-century-store-fronts/

The Art Deco bus terminal at Bay and Dundas Streets.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/torontos-architectural-gems-art-deco-bus-terminal-on-bay-street/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The old Dominion Bank Building at King and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/the-old-dominion-bank-buildingnow-a-condo-hotel-at-one-king-st-west/

The Canada Life Building on University and Queen Street West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/exploring-torontos-architectural-gemsthe-canada-life-building/

Campbell House at the corner of Queen Street West and University Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/18/a-glimpse-at-the-interior-of-campbell-house-at-university-avenue-and-queen-street/

A study of Osgoode Hall

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-osgoode-hall/

Toronto’s first City Hall, now a part of the St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/torontos-first-city-hall-now-a-part-of-the-st-lawrence-market/

The Black Bull Tavern at Queen and Soho Streets, established in 1822

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/27/enjoying-torontos-historic-architectural-gems-queen-streets-black-bull-tavern/

History of the 1867 fence around Osgoode Hall on Queen Street West at York Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/14/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-cast-iron-fence-around-osgoode-hall/

Gathering around the radio as a child in the 1940s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/listening-to-the-radio-as-a-child-in-the-1940s-the-lone-ranger-the-shadow-etc/

The opening of the University Theatre on Bloor Street, west of Bay St.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/the-opening-of-torontos-university-theatre-on-bloor-street/

122 persons perish in the Noronic Disaster on Toronto’s waterfront in 1949

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/25/122-perish-in-torontos-noronic-disaster-horticultural-building-at-cne-used-as-morgue/

Historic Victoria Memorial Square where Toronto’s first cemetery was located, now hidden amid the Entertainment District

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/09/victoria-square-in-torontos-entertainment-district-is-a-gem/

Visiting one of Toronto’s best preserved 19th-century streets-Willcocks Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/20/visiting-torontos-best-preserved-nineteenth-century-street-willcocks-street/

The 1930s Water Maintenance Building on Brant Street, north of St. Andrew’s Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-water-maintenance-building-on-richmond-street-west/

Toronto’s architectural gems-photos of the Old City from a book published by the city in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-old-city-hall-photographed-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/torontos-architectural-gems-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems – the bank on the northeast corner of Queen West and Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/torontos-architectural-gemsbank-at-spadina-and-queen-west/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The St. Lawrence Hall on King Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-st-lawrence-hall/

Toronto’s streetcars through the past decades

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/26/memories-of-torontos-streetcars-of-yesteryear/

History of Trinity Bellwoods Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/the-history-and-beauty-of-trinity-bellwood-park/

A history of Toronto’s famous ferry boats to the Toronto Islands

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/remember-the-toronto-island-ferries-the-bluebell-primroseand-trillium/

 
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Posted by on May 10, 2013 in Toronto

 

Toronto’s architectural gems- building at Queen and Bathurst

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The Occidental Building on the southeast corner of Bathurst and Queen West, now a CB2 store.

It is always encouraging when one of Toronto’s historic buildings is rescued from the wrecker’s ball. Last year the facades of the Occidental Building, on the southeast corner of Bathurst and Queen Street West were brought back to life from an ignominious death, in which it had been confined in a purple coffin (one of the pictures below will explain this strange reference). Anyone who saw the building prior to it being raised from the dead, would have surely buried it to put it out of its misery. Fortunately, it now lives on to enhance the Queen West scene.  

When I researched the history of this building, I was amazed to discover that it was the work of the famous Toronto-born architect E. J. Lennox (1854-1933). He was one of the city’s finest 19th-century architects, who also designed Toronto’s Old City Hall and Casa Loma. Between the years 1876 and 1915, he designed over 70 buildings in Toronto. For the Occidental Building, known at the time as Occident Hall, he chose the Second Empire style, with a Mansard roof and numerous gables inserted in the roof on the north and west sides. The windows on the second floor were topped with Roman arches, but the yellow-brick trim above them is Gothic. This was an unusual arrangement. The red-brick building was one of Lennox’s earliest commissions. It was indeed worthy of restoration, even though only a portion of the original building has survived into the modern era.

The Occidental Building was constructed in 1876 to serve the needs of the Toronto Masons. The Occident and St. George’s Chapters held their meeting in the building. The spacious Blue Room on the top floor, which measured 50’ by 30’ was rented for various functions. This grand hall possessed a massive domed ceiling. Most Masonic Halls in this era contained large halls that they could rent to derive income for the upkeep of the building. The Chapter Room was where they served refreshment. It was considered one of the finest in the city at that time. All the other rooms throughout the building were reputed to contain the finest of furnishings.

When the Occidental Building became the Holiday Tavern in 1948, the top floor containing the Blue Room, as well as the Mansard roof above it, were removed from the structure. Thus, only the ground and second floors of the original structure escaped demolition. The sadly reduced building served as a venue for stage shows, then jazz and R&B musicians, and finally as a place to enjoy a beer and watch strippers. In the mid 1980s, the Ballinger brothers leased the property on a monthly basis and reopened the premises as the Big Bop Night Club and Concert Hall. The building suffered further indignity as its red-brick facades on the first floor were covered over with tile-work and cement and the windows bricked in. The second floor was painted a garish purple. However, the Big Bop remained popular for many years, faithfully attracting fans that enjoyed hardcore metal and other types of modern music.

After new occupants were found for the building, it required around 3 million dollars to complete the restoration. The interior was gutted and the massive pine support-pillars replaced with steel girders. The interior space is in reality a separate entity, housed within the facades of the old building. An open-style steel staircase was inserted between the first and second floors. When entering the building today, the appearance is thoroughly modern. However, the present-day owners have beautifully preserved the facades of this building. It is a pleasing addition to the Queen West neighbourhood. 

Fonds 1244, file 1244, It. 1162  year-1928

This photo from the City of Toronto Archives was taken in 1928. E. J. Lennox designed it in the Second Empire style, which was very popular in Toronto in the 1870s. It is a pity that the top floor and the Mansard roof, with its magnificent dome above the north facade, did not survive the alterations of 1948.

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This view of the intersection of Bathurst and Queen, taken in 1928, is also from the City of Toronto Archives. It was taken from the Occidental Building, gazing to the north and northwest. The Imperial Bank on the northeast corner (right-hand side of the photo) has also been restored, and now is a coffee shop.

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The Occidental Building when it was the Big Bop Tavern and was encased in its purple coffin. Its original brickwork was covered over, although the outline of the windows on the second floor remain visible under the purple paint. I am indebted  to lost-toronto.blogspot.com. for the photo and information concerning the hall.

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The west facade of the Occidental Building, facing Bathurst Street.

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The windows on the second floor are Roman arches, but the yellow-brick trim above them is Gothic. This is an unusual design arrangement.

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The west facade of the building (left) and the south facade that faces Graffiti Alley. The alley used to extend as far east as Augusta Avenue, but the new Loblaw Store now blocks the route. 

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The modern iron staircase between the first and second floors of the CB2 store, which has an amazing assortment of household goods to appeal to downtown condo owners and those who live in homes on the residential streets of the area.  

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Half-way up the staircase is a sign that recalls the days when the building was the Big Bop Night Club

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                                  Occidental Hall, April 29, 2013

Note: I am indebted to www.blogto.com/music/2010/01/the_end_of_the_big_bop for information concerning the Big Bop Club

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view other posts about Toronto’s past and its historic buildings:

Toronto’s magnificent opera house—the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/29/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-four-seasons-centre-opera-house/

Toronto’s hockey palace—Maple Leaf Gardens

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/27/torontos-architectural-gemsmaple-leaf-gardens/

Toronto’s magnificent cathedral spires

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/25/torontos-architectural-gemscathedral-spires/

The historic Cameron House on Queen Street West

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/20/torontos-architectural-gemscameron-house-displays-a-new-mural/

Toronto’s vanishing 19th-century store front.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/torontos-architectural-gems-vanishing-19th-century-store-fronts/

The Art Deco bus terminal at Bay and Dundas Streets.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/torontos-architectural-gems-art-deco-bus-terminal-on-bay-street/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The old Dominion Bank Building at King and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/the-old-dominion-bank-buildingnow-a-condo-hotel-at-one-king-st-west/

The Canada Life Building on University and Queen Street West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/exploring-torontos-architectural-gemsthe-canada-life-building/

Campbell House at the corner of Queen Street West and University Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/18/a-glimpse-at-the-interior-of-campbell-house-at-university-avenue-and-queen-street/

A study of Osgoode Hall

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-osgoode-hall/

Toronto’s first City Hall, now a part of the St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/torontos-first-city-hall-now-a-part-of-the-st-lawrence-market/

Toronto’s Draper Street, a time-tunnel into the 19th century

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/05/23/torontos-draper-street-is-akin-to-a-time-tunnel-into-the-past/

The Black Bull Tavern at Queen and Soho Streets, established in 1822

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/27/enjoying-torontos-historic-architectural-gems-queen-streets-black-bull-tavern/

History of the 1867 fence around Osgoode Hall on Queen Street West at York Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/14/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-cast-iron-fence-around-osgoode-hall/

Gathering around the radio as a child in the 1940s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/listening-to-the-radio-as-a-child-in-the-1940s-the-lone-ranger-the-shadow-etc/

The opening of the University Theatre on Bloor Street, west of Bay St.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/the-opening-of-torontos-university-theatre-on-bloor-street/

122 persons perish in the Noronic Disaster on Toronto’s waterfront in 1949

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/25/122-perish-in-torontos-noronic-disaster-horticultural-building-at-cne-used-as-morgue/

Historic Victoria Memorial Square where Toronto’s first cemetery was located, now hidden amid the Entertainment District

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/09/victoria-square-in-torontos-entertainment-district-is-a-gem/

Visiting one of Toronto’s best preserved 19th-century streets-Willcocks Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/20/visiting-torontos-best-preserved-nineteenth-century-street-willcocks-street/

The 1930s Water Maintenance Building on Brant Street, north of St. Andrew’s Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-water-maintenance-building-on-richmond-street-west/

Toronto’s architectural gems-photos of the Old City from a book published by the city in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-old-city-hall-photographed-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/torontos-architectural-gems-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems – the bank on the northeast corner of Queen West and Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/torontos-architectural-gemsbank-at-spadina-and-queen-west/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The St. Lawrence Hall on King Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-st-lawrence-hall/

Toronto’s streetcars through the past decades

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/26/memories-of-torontos-streetcars-of-yesteryear/

History of Trinity Bellwoods Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/the-history-and-beauty-of-trinity-bellwood-park/

A history of Toronto’s famous ferry boats to the Toronto Islands

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/remember-the-toronto-island-ferries-the-bluebell-primroseand-trillium/

 

,

 
2 Comments

Posted by on May 6, 2013 in Toronto

 

Toronto’s spring gems—dandelions

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I suppose my “spring fever” must be raging when I start to take pleasure in the humble dandelion. I’ll blame my condition upon the cold spring of 2013. When the warm temperatures finally arrived, I hit the streets of the city with renewed fervour. I appreciated more than ever the beauty of a Canadian spring.

My admiration for the common dandelion occurred while I was walking along Queen Street West on a sunny spring morning in early May of 2013. Naturally, I appreciated the numerous spring flowers blooming in the city’s sidewalk-planters and in pots and boxes that the merchants had placed outside their shops. However, I also could not help but notice the tenacious dandelions growing in cracks between the pavement, in tiny strips of soil beside brick walls, and in small grassy areas that had been abandoned to the whims of nature. Because dandelions are a nuisance when they invade the lawns of the city, most people consider them a noxious weed, something to be eradicated by either constant weeding or with pesticides. This is a pity, as their flowers are actually quite attractive and their leaves provide a contrasting bitter taste when mixed with salad greens.

On my walk, it was the ability of the dandelion to survive in extreme conditions that caught my eye. I stopped to gaze at a patch of them growing between the massive stones of the railway underpass, west of Dufferin Street. Then, as I proceeded westward toward Parkdale, I noticed a vacant corner lot where the small yellow flowers sprouted gloriously in an expansive field of unkempt  grass. Later, as I passed Roncesvalles Avenue, I saw another area where the dandelions enriched a patch of land covered where other wild flowers were growing.

I wonder if gardeners seriously cultivated dandelions, fertilizing them, and selecting the seeds from those that grew the largest blossoms, if a truly excellent quality flower might be produced. Likely the neighbours would shoot any gardener who attempted such a project as their unwanted seeds would pollute the lawns of the area. However, I can’t help but wonder ! 

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A clump of dandelions perched tenaciously among the stones of the railway underpass, west of Dufferin Street.

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Dandelions in a corner lot in Parkdale, on the south side of Queen Street.

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Dandelions growing beside a wall, west of the Roncesvalles and King/Queen intersection.

The poem below is quaintly out of date in the modern era. However, it’s finally spring. What the hell !

                                     To the Dandelion

Dear common flower, that grow’st beside the way,
Fringing the dusty road with harmless gold,
First pledge of blithesome May,
Which children pluck, and, full of pride, uphold,
High-hearted buccaneers, o’erjoyed that they
An Eldorado in the grass have found,
Which not the rich earth’s ample round
May
match in wealth, thou art more dear to me
Than all the prouder summer-blooms may be.

James Russell Lowell  (1819-1891)

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This cartoon was in the Toronto Star comic section on Saturday, May 4, 2013

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view other posts about Toronto that hopefully display less spring fever:

A 5 km walk following the path the American invaders marched on April 27, 1813 during the Battle Of York.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/05/02/commemoration-of-the-battle-of-yorkapril-27-1813april-272013/

Toronto’s first cemetery and monument to those who served in the War of 1812

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/23/torontos-architectural-gemssculpture-to-soldiers-of-the-war-of-1812/

Toronto’s historic cathedral spires

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/25/torontos-architectural-gemscathedral-spires/

Toronto’s vanishing 19th-century store fronts.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/torontos-architectural-gems-vanishing-19th-century-store-fronts/

The Art Deco bus terminal at Bay and Dundas Streets.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/torontos-architectural-gems-art-deco-bus-terminal-on-bay-street/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The old Dominion Bank Building at King and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/the-old-dominion-bank-buildingnow-a-condo-hotel-at-one-king-st-west/

The Canada Life Building on University and Queen Street West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/exploring-torontos-architectural-gemsthe-canada-life-building/

Campbell House at the corner of Queen Street West and University Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/18/a-glimpse-at-the-interior-of-campbell-house-at-university-avenue-and-queen-street/

A study of Osgoode Hall

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-osgoode-hall/

Toronto’s first City Hall, now a part of the St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/torontos-first-city-hall-now-a-part-of-the-st-lawrence-market/

Toronto’s Draper Street, a time-tunnel into the 19th century

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/05/23/torontos-draper-street-is-akin-to-a-time-tunnel-into-the-past/

The Black Bull Tavern at Queen and Soho Streets, established in 1822

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/27/enjoying-torontos-historic-architectural-gems-queen-streets-black-bull-tavern/

History of the 1867 fence around Osgoode Hall on Queen Street West at York Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/14/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-cast-iron-fence-around-osgoode-hall/

Gathering around the radio as a child in the 1940s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/listening-to-the-radio-as-a-child-in-the-1940s-the-lone-ranger-the-shadow-etc/

The opening of the University Theatre on Bloor Street, west of Bay St.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/the-opening-of-torontos-university-theatre-on-bloor-street/

122 persons perish in the Noronic Disaster on Toronto’s waterfront in 1949

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/25/122-perish-in-torontos-noronic-disaster-horticultural-building-at-cne-used-as-morgue/

Historic Victoria Memorial Square where Toronto’s first cemetery was located, now hidden amid the Entertainment District

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/09/victoria-square-in-torontos-entertainment-district-is-a-gem/

Visiting one of Toronto’s best preserved 19th-century streets-Willcocks Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/20/visiting-torontos-best-preserved-nineteenth-century-street-willcocks-street/

The 1930s Water Maintenance Building on Brant Street, north of St. Andrew’s Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-water-maintenance-building-on-richmond-street-west/

Toronto’s architectural gems-photos of the Old City from a book published by the city in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-old-city-hall-photographed-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/torontos-architectural-gems-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems – the bank on the northeast corner of Queen West and Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/torontos-architectural-gemsbank-at-spadina-and-queen-west/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The St. Lawrence Hall on King Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-st-lawrence-hall/

Toronto’s streetcars through the past decades

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/26/memories-of-torontos-streetcars-of-yesteryear/

History of Trinity Bellwoods Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/the-history-and-beauty-of-trinity-bellwood-park/

A history of Toronto’s famous ferry boats to the Toronto Islands

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/remember-the-toronto-island-ferries-the-bluebell-primroseand-trillium/

 

 
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Posted by on May 4, 2013 in Toronto

 

Commemoration of the Battle of York—April 27, 1813—April 27,2013

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On April 27, 1813, a fleet of 14 sailing ships, containing 2500 men, appeared off the shore, west of the small town of York. The War of 1812 had now been dramatically brought to the small settlement of York, which consisted of about 700 persons, their homes located at the far eastern end of Toronto harbour. The photo of the above watercolour is  from the Toronto Interpretive Centre, site of Upper Canada’s (Ontario’s) first Parliament Buildings. In 1813, before April 27th ended, these brick buildings would be torched.

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This is the site today, where the Americans came ashore on the morning of April 27, 1813. The shoreline is now further away from the lake than it was in 1813, due to landfill. The embankment that skirted the narrow beach has also disappeared. To celebrate the 200th anniversary of the invasion, crowds gathered on the 200th anniversary of the invasion, 27 April 2013, to commemorate the event. The 5 km-walk included five stops where the participants listened to stories about the battle that occurred near where the stops were situated. Loud-speakers allowed the interpretive speakers to be clearly heard.

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A portion of the crowds that gathered to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Battle of York.

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A plaque was unveiled close to the place where the Americans came shore. John Moore, host of CFRB “Moore in the Morning,” who attended the walk and introduced it, stated that Canadians are likely the only people in the world who would gather to commemorate a battle that they lost.

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As the morning progressed, the size of the crowds grew. They followed the path that the Americans travelled as they proceeded from the landing site toward their target at Fort York.

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Scadding cabin was opened for the day to permit visitors to inspect the interior of Toronto’s oldest existing habitation. Built in 1794, it was relocated to the Exhibition grounds in 1879.

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One of the interpreters who provided fascinating details and stories of the fighting during the Battle of York.

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People gather near the Princes’ Gates to hear about the explosion of the western battery, which eliminated the last defense protecting Fort York from the invading Americans.

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Fort York was the final stop on the 5 km walk. The crowds listened intently at they heard about the explosion of the powder magazine located inside the fort. It contained 300 barrels of gunpowder (30,000 pounds). Thirty-eight of the advancing Americans were killed, including their commander, General Pike. Over 200 American soldiers were wounded. The Americans looted the town of York and set aflame the brick Parliament Buildings. When British forces attacked Washington the following year, in retaliation, they set fire to the presidential mansion. Whitewash was applied to the walls of the mansion to hide the effects of the burning and the resulting smoke. The house has been known ever since as “The White House.” 

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Fort York was opened to the public for the day, with no entrance fee. Visitors mingled with men and women dressed in 19th-century military uniforms.

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It was a glorious sunny day, excellent for a walk along the Toronto’s lakeshore and a chance to learn about the city’s history. It was approximately 1 1/2 hours in length.

Heritage Toronto is offering another tour related to the War of 1812 on Sunday, June 2 at 1 pm. It begins at the main(west) entrance of Fort York. There is no charge for the tour. For further information on this and other tours www.heritagetoronto.org

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view other posts about Toronto’s past and its historic buildings:

Toronto’s first cemetery and monument to those who served in the War of 1812

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/23/torontos-architectural-gemssculpture-to-soldiers-of-the-war-of-1812/

Toronto’s historic cathedral spires

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/25/torontos-architectural-gemscathedral-spires/

Toronto’s vanishing 19th-century store fronts.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/torontos-architectural-gems-vanishing-19th-century-store-fronts/

The Art Deco bus terminal at Bay and Dundas Streets.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/torontos-architectural-gems-art-deco-bus-terminal-on-bay-street/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The old Dominion Bank Building at King and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/the-old-dominion-bank-buildingnow-a-condo-hotel-at-one-king-st-west/

The Canada Life Building on University and Queen Street West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/exploring-torontos-architectural-gemsthe-canada-life-building/

Campbell House at the corner of Queen Street West and University Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/18/a-glimpse-at-the-interior-of-campbell-house-at-university-avenue-and-queen-street/

A study of Osgoode Hall

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-osgoode-hall/

Toronto’s first City Hall, now a part of the St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/torontos-first-city-hall-now-a-part-of-the-st-lawrence-market/

Toronto’s Draper Street, a time-tunnel into the 19th century

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/05/23/torontos-draper-street-is-akin-to-a-time-tunnel-into-the-past/

The Black Bull Tavern at Queen and Soho Streets, established in 1822

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/27/enjoying-torontos-historic-architectural-gems-queen-streets-black-bull-tavern/

History of the 1867 fence around Osgoode Hall on Queen Street West at York Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/14/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-cast-iron-fence-around-osgoode-hall/

Gathering around the radio as a child in the 1940s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/listening-to-the-radio-as-a-child-in-the-1940s-the-lone-ranger-the-shadow-etc/

The opening of the University Theatre on Bloor Street, west of Bay St.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/the-opening-of-torontos-university-theatre-on-bloor-street/

122 persons perish in the Noronic Disaster on Toronto’s waterfront in 1949

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/25/122-perish-in-torontos-noronic-disaster-horticultural-building-at-cne-used-as-morgue/

Historic Victoria Memorial Square where Toronto’s first cemetery was located, now hidden amid the Entertainment District

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/09/victoria-square-in-torontos-entertainment-district-is-a-gem/

Visiting one of Toronto’s best preserved 19th-century streets-Willcocks Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/20/visiting-torontos-best-preserved-nineteenth-century-street-willcocks-street/

The 1930s Water Maintenance Building on Brant Street, north of St. Andrew’s Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-water-maintenance-building-on-richmond-street-west/

Toronto’s architectural gems-photos of the Old City from a book published by the city in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-old-city-hall-photographed-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/torontos-architectural-gems-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems – the bank on the northeast corner of Queen West and Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/torontos-architectural-gemsbank-at-spadina-and-queen-west/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The St. Lawrence Hall on King Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-st-lawrence-hall/

Toronto’s streetcars through the past decades

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/26/memories-of-torontos-streetcars-of-yesteryear/

History of Trinity Bellwoods Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/the-history-and-beauty-of-trinity-bellwood-park/

A history of Toronto’s famous ferry boats to the Toronto Islands

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/remember-the-toronto-island-ferries-the-bluebell-primroseand-trillium/

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 2, 2013 in Toronto

 

Kensington Market—Seven Seas Fish Market—gone!

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When this small Kensington market scene was painted in 2002, there were four thriving fish markets on Baldwin Street. Although a new one opened in 2012, there remain only three seafood shops, as another one has now closed.  The Seven Seas Fish Market has moved in with the Coral Sea Market. The Coral Sea and the Seven Seas Fish Markets were housed within a pair of old house, numbers 198 and 196 Baldwin Street. The second storey of the left-hand house (198 Baldwin St.) is visible in the painting above. It was the home of Abraham Prussky, who resided in the dwelling until Max Katz purchased it. Mr. Katz and added a store front in 1929 and relocated his grocery store to the building after he was forced to  move from the larger premises on the northeast corner of Baldwin and Augusta. He remained at 198 Baldwin Street until 1935, when he relocated once more to a location across the street at 195 Baldwin Street. This site was the location of the New Seaway Fish Market, which ceased operation this year (2013).

I wish the combined fish markets every success.  

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The two markets at 196 and 198 Baldwin Street on May 1st, 2013.

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Signage in the window (left photo) of the Seven Seas Fish Market, and the sign on the roof of the market (right) 

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          The sign on the door of the shop, in May of 2013

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               The Seven Seas Market, now closed.

To view the Home Page for this blog: https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/

To view other posts about Toronto’s Kensington Market

Casa Acoreana and other gems on a summer day in the Kensington Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/03/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-entire-kensington-market/

Kensington’s Casa Acoreana soon the close ! 

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/03/09/kensington-market-gem-soon-to-disappear/

To view other posts about Toronto’s past and its historic buildings:

Toronto’s first cemetery and monument to those who served in the War of 1812

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/23/torontos-architectural-gemssculpture-to-soldiers-of-the-war-of-1812/

Toronto’s historic cathedral spires

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/25/torontos-architectural-gemscathedral-spires/

Toronto’s vanishing 19th-century store fronts.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/torontos-architectural-gems-vanishing-19th-century-store-fronts/

The Art Deco bus terminal at Bay and Dundas Streets.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/torontos-architectural-gems-art-deco-bus-terminal-on-bay-street/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The old Dominion Bank Building at King and Yonge Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/the-old-dominion-bank-buildingnow-a-condo-hotel-at-one-king-st-west/

The Canada Life Building on University and Queen Street West.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/exploring-torontos-architectural-gemsthe-canada-life-building/

Campbell House at the corner of Queen Street West and University Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2011/08/18/a-glimpse-at-the-interior-of-campbell-house-at-university-avenue-and-queen-street/

A study of Osgoode Hall

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-osgoode-hall/

Toronto’s first City Hall, now a part of the St. Lawrence Market

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/torontos-first-city-hall-now-a-part-of-the-st-lawrence-market/

Toronto’s Draper Street, a time-tunnel into the 19th century

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/05/23/torontos-draper-street-is-akin-to-a-time-tunnel-into-the-past/

The Black Bull Tavern at Queen and Soho Streets, established in 1822

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/27/enjoying-torontos-historic-architectural-gems-queen-streets-black-bull-tavern/

History of the 1867 fence around Osgoode Hall on Queen Street West at York Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/14/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-cast-iron-fence-around-osgoode-hall/

Gathering around the radio as a child in the 1940s

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/listening-to-the-radio-as-a-child-in-the-1940s-the-lone-ranger-the-shadow-etc/

The opening of the University Theatre on Bloor Street, west of Bay St.

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/the-opening-of-torontos-university-theatre-on-bloor-street/

122 persons perish in the Noronic Disaster on Toronto’s waterfront in 1949

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/25/122-perish-in-torontos-noronic-disaster-horticultural-building-at-cne-used-as-morgue/

Historic Victoria Memorial Square where Toronto’s first cemetery was located, now hidden amid the Entertainment District

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/09/victoria-square-in-torontos-entertainment-district-is-a-gem/

Visiting one of Toronto’s best preserved 19th-century streets-Willcocks Avenue

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/09/20/visiting-torontos-best-preserved-nineteenth-century-street-willcocks-street/

The 1930s Water Maintenance Building on Brant Street, north of St. Andrew’s Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-water-maintenance-building-on-richmond-street-west/

Toronto’s architectural gems-photos of the Old City from a book published by the city in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/torontos-architectural-gemsthe-old-city-hall-photographed-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems in 1912

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/torontos-architectural-gems-in-1912/

Toronto’s architectural gems – the bank on the northeast corner of Queen West and Spadina

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/torontos-architectural-gemsbank-at-spadina-and-queen-west/

Photos of the surroundings of the CN Tower and and the St. Lawrence Market in 1977

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/photos-of-the-surroundings-of-the-st-lawrence-market-and-cn-tower-in-1977/

The St. Lawrence Hall on King Street

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/enjoying-torontos-architectural-gems-the-st-lawrence-hall/

Toronto’s streetcars through the past decades

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/03/26/memories-of-torontos-streetcars-of-yesteryear/

History of Trinity Bellwoods Park

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/the-history-and-beauty-of-trinity-bellwood-park/

A history of Toronto’s famous ferry boats to the Toronto Islands

https://tayloronhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/remember-the-toronto-island-ferries-the-bluebell-primroseand-trillium/

 
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Posted by on May 1, 2013 in Toronto